Transit Seating Employs Economical Advances

Posted on March 13, 2013 by Brittni Rubin, Assistant Editor

Page 1 of 3

American Seating’s newest offerings are upholstered with patented cushions and fabrics that absorb cuts, slashes and more.
American Seating’s newest offerings are upholstered with patented cushions and fabrics that absorb cuts, slashes and more.
Economical advancements are an essential part of the next generation of transportation seating products. A longer lifespan, bus layout flexibility, lightweight solutions and safety are just a few of the features manufacturers are prioritizing in response to the greater need for long-term sustainability.

Lifecycle cost considerations
With limited budgets and growing industry environmental consciousness, transit agencies place a large importance on seat durability. The goal is to save resources by replacing seats as infrequently as possible, and more companies on the market are finding ways to preserve lifespan.

Vandalism is a major industry concern and the single biggest cause of repair, according to Kimberly Miko, marketing coordinator for Grand Rapids, Mich.-based American Seating. To combat this, the company’s newest seats are upholstered with special patented cushions and fabrics modified to absorb cuts, slashes and other abuse.

Kiel, a German seating company that recently opened its North American offices in Elkhart, Ind., gives customers the option of high-gloss vandal-resistant surfaces (Ideo and Centra) or stainless steel (Intra).

Similarly, Exton, Pa.-based 4ONE LLC released its upgraded Gemini seat featuring T2C inserts, which are padded tough-to-cut vandal-resistant inserts, for chair cushions.

“Transit agencies that I’ve talked to are looking to reduce operating expenses by investing in properly engineered and supported products,” says Raymond Melleady, VP, sales, at 4ONE. “Think of vandal-proof seats, or things that will reduce inventory levels over the life of the vehicle. Another big one would be interchangeability.”

Chicago-based Freedman Seating Co.’s Go Seat comes equipped with “Lock N Go” removable cushions, exemplifying interchangeability as a way to cut down seat replacement.

“Safety is our number one concern, but our second goal is durability,” says Dan Cohen, VP, sales and marketing, for Freedman. “We want to produce a product that’s going to last the life of the bus. The standard bus is designed to last between seven and 12 years — so are our seats.”

While lightweight products can improve fuel economy, some customers have noticed it occasionally comes at the cost of durability. But, companies are now trying to produce seats that marry the two features.

4ONE’s new Gemini, for example, is a lighter-weight ergonomic seat that’s also high in strength because of its calculated design.

“The latest trend in the transit market is definitely providing options that maximize fuel efficiency without compromising the longevity of a seat’s lifecycle,” says Melleady.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Q'Straint webinar to discuss rearward-facing securement

This presentation will explore developing ridership trends facing transit providers, offer an overview of the current research on rearward facing securement, and examine how emerging technologies are addressing the previous shortcomings of primitive rearward securement applications.

Senior housing provider partners with Lyft for pilot program

The partnership will allow Brookdale residents to book a Lyft ride on-demand or schedule in advance through a concierge in their community.

New Houston Metro pilot increases access for paratransit riders

Set to launch in January, the program will allow those riders that use MetroLift paratransit buses to ride those buses to a transit center and then transfer to a regular fixed-route bus

Mobility Networks launches North American operations

Officially launched and unveiled a range of pioneering access products to the U.S. market at BusCon Expo, which was held Sept. 19 to 21 at the Indiana Convention Center in Indianapolis. Company also opened two offices in New York and Toronto.

Easterseals' initiative provides mobility access for seniors, people with disabilities

The initiative will begin in selected rural communities in Minnesota, Wisconsin, North Dakota, South Dakota, Washington, Montana and Alaska.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment


Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close