Accessibility

Feds propose new rear visibility regs

Posted on December 3, 2010

On Friday, the U.S. Department of Transportation proposed a new safety regulation to help eliminate blind zones behind vehicles that can hide the presence of pedestrians, especially young children and the elderly.

The proposed rule was required by Congress as part of the Cameron Gulbransen Kids Transportation Safety Act of 2007. Two-year old Cameron Gulbransen, for whom the Act is named, was killed when his father accidentally backed over him in the family's driveway.

The proposal, issued by the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA), would expand the required field of view for all passenger cars, pickup trucks, minivans, buses and low-speed vehicles with a gross vehicle weight rating of up to 10,000 pounds, so that drivers can see directly behind the vehicle when the vehicle's transmission is in reverse.

NHTSA believes automobile manufacturers will install rear-mounted video cameras and in-vehicle displays to meet the proposed standards. To meet the requirements of the proposed rule, 10 percent of new vehicles must comply by September 2012, 40 percent by September 2013 and 100 percent by September 2014.

NHTSA is providing a 60-day comment period on this rulemaking that begins when the proposal is published in the Federal Register.

 

 

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