Accessibility

Valley Metro to take on ADA service

Posted on December 22, 2010

Phoenix, Ariz.'s Valley Metro will now offer transit service based on the passenger's trip need, after an announcement made by Sun Cities Area Transit (SCAT), stating that the agency will no longer provide transportation service to residents in the Sun City area.

"We have been very supportive of SCAT for more than 20 years and realize that many Sun City residents have come to rely on the transit service," said David A. Boggs, Valley Metro executive director. "Beginning with the New Year, we will provide the ADA-required trips. In addition, we will provide other trips according to what we can afford to operate."

Valley Metro provides about $200,000 annually to SCAT to assist with the operations of their service. The funding primarily comes from Proposition 400 sales tax revenues that Maricopa County voters approved in 2004. Revenues are also provided through some federal funds. The 10 vehicles operated by SCAT were provided by Valley Metro.

Effective Jan. 1, Valley Metro will offer trips to passengers that are Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) certified and passengers that need life sustaining trips such as dialysis or chemotherapy.

Valley Metro is partnering with Discount Cab to offer the ADA trips within the Route 106 service area or medically life-sustaining passenger trips. ADA trips cost $2.00 one-way, other trips cost $4.00 one-way. Exact cash fare is required. SCAT Dial-a-Ride tickets will be accepted through Jan. 31, 2011.

Options for passengers who are not ADA certified or require medically life-sustaining trips include a volunteer driver program through Benevilla. The trips are based on volunteer availability and Benevilla requests a 24 hour to 48 hour advance notice.

Passengers will also be able to find a list of transportation providers for older adults, persons with disabilities, persons that are developmentally disabled or persons that are low income at the Maricopa Association of Governments' website.

 

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