Accessibility

Study: Transit drivers involved in collisions twice as likely to use phone while driving

Posted on January 18, 2011

[IMAGE]cell-phone-2.jpg[/IMAGE]Transit drivers who have been involved in a collision are twice as likely to regularly use a handheld cell phone compared to those drivers who have not been involved in a collision, according to a new study released last week.

The study, conducted by DriveCam Inc. as a part of its Driving Insights newsletter series, looks at recurring distracted driving behaviors among transit drivers.

The company found that while handheld cell use is the most commonly identified risky distraction, eating and/or drinking while driving is not far behind. In fact, drivers involved in one or more collisions are 1.8 times more likely to regularly eat or drink while driving.

The study focused on the analysis of more than 20,000 drivers in the transit industry who were active between June 2009 and June 2010. The difference between collision and non-collision drivers’ distracted driving behaviors was evaluated for this study in order to identify the distractions with a statistically significant difference. Once these distractions were identified, the probability of a collision given the number of times the distraction was observed was calculated.

Drivers involved in one or more collisions are:

  • 1.6 times more likely to be regularly distracted by any type of identified distraction (handheld cell, food/drink, GPS, etc).
  • 1.8 times more likely to be regularly distracted by food and/or drinks.
  • 2.0 times more likely to be regularly distracted by a handheld cell phone.

Other distractions, most interestingly, hands-free cell devices, did not show a statistically significant behavior difference between collision and non-collision drivers in the transit industry.

DriveCam’s Video Event Recorder provides the ability to identify when a collision has occurred. The company does not analyze collision events for legal reasons; however, extensive video event review of a driver’s prior non-collision poor driving behaviors allows DriveCam to better understand those behaviors that act as leading indicators of collisions. Identifying these behaviors provides safety managers a focused direction in coaching and training.

DriveCam’s Driving Insights newsletter series is designed to provide insight for executives and managers throughout a variety of transportation industries. It is derived from DriveCam’s extensive database of driving events from over 3 billion driving miles — the largest in the world, according to the company. Driving Insights is released on a regular basis.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Q'Straint's automatic rear-facing wheelchair securement station brought to market

Now available for buses and other transportation companies, the Quantum's self-securement process takes less than 25 seconds, and does not require the driver to leave his or her seat to help.

Wisconsin set to vote on transportation network company bill

The bill would create a new license for TNCs, including companies like Uber and Lyft, making it mandatory to pay a $5,000 fee, conduct background checks on drivers and maintain at least $1 million in liability insurance in order to operate in Wisconsin.

Champion Bus, Dallas Smith sign exclusive licensing agreement

Agreement covers use of Dallas Smith's existing and future commercial bus technologies as optional features on the Champion Bus LF Transport™ low-floor model. Dallas Smith’s existing patented technologies include the Equalizer Ramp® and the IntelliSYNC® electronically-controlled “smart” suspension system, with low-speed OverRise™ function.

Pa. transit agency to purchase 12 paratransit vehicles

The Westmoreland County Transit Authority's $600,000 state grant will be used to buy the seven-seat minibuses that can hold up to two wheelchairs. The vehicles will be given to private transportation companies that serve as contractors for the paratransit system.

Report finds N.Y. MTA paratransit taxi program scammed

The agency agreed to implement stronger anti-fraud controls recommended by the inspector general’s office. The report doesn’t identify who carried out the fraud or quantify the cost to the MTA.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)



More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close