April 2013

Propane Fueling Kansas City Fleet

by Alex Roman, Managing Editor

By the end of April, the Unified Government of Wyandotte County/Kansas City, Kan. (UG), will have converted 13 paratransit buses, as well as two pickup trucks, to propane autogas; a move anticipated to save county taxpayers at least $100,000 in annual fuel costs. The savings represents a 74% reduction in cost for these converted vehicles.

Ferrell Autogas is supplying the fuel station and dispenser and providing propane safety training for staff. The conversion costs nearly $9,000 per vehicle; however, the project is being funded through an Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant, awarded to the UG in 2010.

Through its partnership with Ferrell, the UG is able to lock in an annual savings less than one-half the cost of gasoline, said UG Fleet Manager Merle McCullough.

Also referred to as autogas and liquefied petroleum gas, propane is made in the U.S. and is a cleaner fuel, which could improve the life of the engine.
In addition to the annual savings in fuel costs by establishing a set price, propane fleet vehicles, on average, reduce greenhouse gas emissions by 18% and create 20% less nitrogen oxide, up to 60% less carbon monoxide, and fewer particulate emissions than gasoline versions of the same models, according to the Propane Education & Research Council.


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