Urban and rural transit, different yet similar

Posted on March 1, 2012 by Louie Maiello - Also by this author

Public transit in rural and small urban areas is provided primarily to those groups who are dependent on this form of transportation, such as the elderly and disabled. Public transit includes buses, commuter rail, demand response services, light rail and vanpools. This service is primarily local in nature.

National RTAP and its partner organizations, the Federal Transit Administration and the National Tribal Transit Association, will sponsor a national conference on March 18 to 21, 2012 at the Radisson, Fort McDowell Hotel near Scottsdale, Ariz.

Unique issues facing rural and small urban properties will be discussed. The company I consult for, FAAC Incorporated, is providing its shuttle van driver training simulator to raise awareness of the capabilities of simulator supplemental training in rural training programs. Having a simulator there will provide a great opportunity to participate in determining corrective action solutions to some of the most frequently occurring collisions facing rural and small urban properties.

At the conference I am slated to conduct three educational sessions on driver training simulation as a means toward negating the challenges faced by rural operators. The sessions will include an overview on what a simulator training program looks like, how to introduce a simulator into the 'basic skill development' portion of a training program and how to work with veteran operators. If you are planning to attend, please stop by and say 'hi.' FAAC has a booth, and you can find me there or in a special room where the simulator will be set up. See how this technology can ensure that a leading collision for one year does not repeat itself the following year.

My dealings in surface transit were mostly centered on buses that were between 40 feet and 60 feet in length. Approximately 99% of the time these buses were serving the needs of customers within the five boroughs of New York. Bus collision types did not vary much among large transit agencies then, and I find that to still be true. Recently, however, while accumulating data on rural transit issues, I immediately noticed the differences in collision types versus larger agencies. In agencies equipped with larger vehicles, where backing is discouraged by increased forward-planning applications, backing collisions resulting in contact with fixed objects were right at the top of the list for one regional rural property. There were several other findings, but I am not privileged to list them all in this blog.

Corrective action training in the prevention of incidents/collisions, along with having standard operating procedures in place, will contribute to safe operations among all transit agencies, small or large. Standardized training for new hires, providing annual refresher training for all operators, and being proactive with regard to reducing high-profile, frequently occurring incidents, are all key elements of a complete training solution package.

Adequate training should be provided in:

  • Boarding and alighting.
  • Special needs individuals.
  • Dealing with difficult passengers.
  • Wheelchair lift operation and securement.
  • Vehicle fires and evacuation.
  • Personal safety.

People skills are at a premium due to the greater personalized interaction within rural and small urban agencies, and between customers/passengers and the vehicle operators.

In case you missed it...

Read our METRO blog, "OCTA CEO: Planes, trains and automobiles - but what about bikes?" here.

 

View comments or post a comment on this story. (2 Comments)

More Safety Corner Blog Posts

March 26, 2015

Security and Surveillance in Transportation

Physical security surveillance is one of the most vital facets of a transit system’s security plan. In the past, recording was primarily done by analog video cameras, but those systems are now updated with IP cameras that have features like greater data storage and ultra HD imaging. Moreover, today’s surveillance has moved beyond video to audio monitoring. By integrating audio and video, security directors have access to more evidence for reported incidents and accident investigations. Audio also provides accountability for employees, capturing if a train engineer was talking on his cell phone on duty or if a train ticket examiner was providing poor customer service.

March 9, 2015

Caution When Passing Other Buses In 'The Zone'

I recently had the opportunity to view a video that captured what could have been a fatal pedestrian knockdown if contact had occurred. A bus overtaking another bus positioned in the bus stop zone occurs routinely and usually without incident, but if not performed correctly, this type of situation can end with catastrophic results.

February 25, 2015

Transit Emergency: What Can You Do to Stay Safe?

Recent national incidents have put increased attention on safe commuting and what passengers can do to protect themselves during a transit emergency. “The most important tip anyone can follow is to wait for the instructions of the crew,” said Scott Sauer, chief system safety officer for SEPTA. “Crews know the equipment best and have been trained to safely remove passengers from vehicles should the situation warrant evacuation...

February 4, 2015

Simple, Effective Measures to Reduce Bus Collisions at Your Agency

Are you getting frustrated because — in spite of what you’re doing — collisions are not dropping at your agency? With just a few tweaks, you can make a difference. If you are a chief training officer, training director, instructor or equivalent at your agency, then this message is for you.

January 15, 2015

How to Develop an Extreme Defensive Driving Program

I may be all alone on this one, but I discovered that my kids (who were not allowed to play “shooter” video games) developed a distinct style of driving (and a lot of unsafe habits) while playing their video driving games as pre-teens and young teenagers. In fact, I wound up spending a great deal of my time trying to undo these habits and deep set tendencies while my boys still had their learner's permits.

See More

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (2)

Please sign in or register to .    Close