Bus

Today's Transit Shelters Include Modern Trends, Traditional Looks

Posted on August 19, 2013 by Jack Chavdarian, Assistant Editor

Page 1 of 3

Jamaica, N.Y.-based Columbia Equipment Co. Inc. offers a wide range of traditional and modern shelter designs.
Jamaica, N.Y.-based Columbia Equipment Co. Inc. offers a wide range of traditional and modern shelter designs.
A new wave of modern visual trends has taken hold in the bus shelter design arena, but there’s still a demand for more traditional shelters from customers. Out with the old and in with the new doesn’t entirely apply to today’s demand for bus shelter design.

Arthur Cohen, president of Jamaica, N.Y.-based bus shelter manufacturer Columbia Equipment Co. Inc., says his company offers both styles to his customers for this reason.

“There are customers today who are looking for more contemporary designs and others who want the ‘old fashioned’ look, so we offer these and more,” Cohen says.

For example, a new and edgy shopping mall may request a modern looking bus shelter that fits in with their design, but they wouldn’t be interested in the traditional looking bus shelter because it’s not how they view themselves, he adds.

On the other end of the spectrum, a government agency may be looking for a more traditional style and basic format. Some newer designs may not fit into the environment and architectural theme of the agency.

Aside from tradition, Patrick Merrick, executive VP of Corona, Calif.-based transit shelter and street shelter manufacturer Tolar Manufacturing, says a newer idea being considered by his customers when designing a bus shelter is its branding capability. The shelter itself is being used as a marketable way to get an agency’s name out to anyone who may see the transit center.

“Agencies are looking always from the old traditional boxes and are recognizing the opportunity to use shelters as part of branding their agency,” he says.

Although trends and traditions are an important aspect when considering shelter design, an even more compelling reason one sways toward a particular style is the cost.

“Transit systems want a distinctive look for their community, but they also look at [it in terms of] maintenance costs,” Cohen explains.
Tolar spends a significant amount of time thinking of transit shelter costs for the client down the road by working toward purpose-driven designs that take into account saving money in future maintenance costs and replacement parts.

“If we can provide, through listening to the needs and expectations of our customers, a distinctive look that also incorporates a purpose-driven design, on time and on budget, which helps an agency grow their ridership, we have done our job,” Merrick says.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Drunk driver strikes NJ TRANSIT bus

The vehicle drove into the bus around 2 a.m., with the badly injured driver of the car trying to flee on foot before being arrested at a nearby gas station. The driver’s blood alcohol content was more than twice the legal limit, according to the report.

BC Transit piloting video cameras on buses

Up to six cameras will be installed on each bus. There is no live monitoring of the video which will only be removed and viewed by authorized security staff following a reported incident. Only video required for security purposes will be retained, all other video will be erased.

Calif. agencies approve merger

Pending adoption by its member entities, the merger between Victor Valley Transit Authority and Barstow Area Transit is slated to take effect July 1, 2015.

MCI Stands Up for Transportation in Pembina, Chicago and Louisville

Officials at MCI’s Pembina plant included Rep. Kevin Cramer, R-N.D.; North Dakota Commerce Department Commissioner Alan Anderson; Gail Hand, northeastern director for Sen Heidi Heitkamp, D-N.D.; Tom Brusegaard, regional director for Sen. John Hoeven, R-N.D;  Pembina County Commissioner Hetty Walker; and Cavalier, N.D. Mayor Ken Briese.

Uber adds rickshaws to service in India

Drivers are told to say ‘namaste,’ a common Indian greeting, and are encouraged to use their meters. Uber pays its drivers an additional 40 rupees, or just over 60 cents, per ride on top of the fare.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close