Bus

LaHood unveils 2009 distracted driving fatality, injury numbers

Posted on September 20, 2010

On the eve of the 2010 Distracted Driving Summit, U.S. Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood announced that distracted driving-related crashes claimed 5,474 lives and led to 448,000 traffic injuries across the U.S. in 2009. According to National Highway Traffic Safety Administration (NHTSA) research, distraction-related fatalities represented 16 percent of overall traffic fatalities in 2009 — the same percentage as in 2008.

In a Sunday op-ed for the Orlando Sentinel, Secretary LaHood revealed the latest statistics, but cautioned that researchers believe the epidemic of distracted driving is likely far greater than currently known. Police reports in many states still do not routinely document whether distraction was a factor in vehicle crashes, making it more difficult to know the full extent of the problem.

To read the op-ed, click here.

The NHTSA study found that the proportion of fatalities associated with driver distraction increased from 10 percent to 16 percent between 2005 and 2009. This news comes as overall traffic fatalities fell in 2009 to their lowest levels since 1950.

According to NHTSA data, the age group with the greatest proportion of distracted drivers was the under-20 age group. Sixteen percent of all under-20 drivers involved in a fatal crash were reported to have been distracted while driving. Of those drivers involved in fatal crashes who were reportedly distracted, the 30-39 year old group had the highest proportion of cell phone involvement. The report can be seen here.

On Tuesday, Sept. 21, Secretary LaHood will convene a second National Distracted Driving Summit in Washington, D.C. Leading transportation officials, safety advocates, law enforcement, industry representatives, researchers and the family members of victims of distraction-related crashes will come together to address challenges and identify opportunities for national anti-distracted driving efforts.  

For more information about distracted driving and the 2010 Distracted Driving Summit, click here.

 

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

BusCon returns to Indy

Each year, more and more people look forward to BusCon as a chance to network, learn about new trends and technology, and gain the tools that are necessary to revitalize the way they tackle their own operations.

Project team wins award for N.Y. bus time displays

The countdown clocks were developed in part to address concerns about the overall accessibility of MTA’s Bus Time system, which sends wait-time information to riders via text message, a QR code scan, or over a web site.

Boston could benefit from more BRT, report says

The report argues that the city should be pushing for the “gold standard” of BRT. That would include a control station that monitors buses and ensures they come at well-spaced intervals and enclosed stops that shelter customers.

Calif.'s OCTA to launch new bus design

The existing design, more than 20 years old, will be phased out to make way for the new look that prominently features a light blue and orange wave across the bus and the words “OC Bus.”

5 retired Honolulu buses to be turned into homeless shelters

According to the plan, each bus will serve a specific purpose, with some including restrooms and showers and others being equipped with beds.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close