Bus

MCI's 6000th unit rolls off E/J line

Posted on November 18, 2011

MCI gathered employees from throughout its plants to mark the delivery of the 6,000th unit off the company's E/J assembly line to the Shriners of British Columbia and Yukon, who will use the new J4500 to provide medical transport to children.

"Everyone at MCI has an important role in providing our customers with industry leading, quality coaches," said Bryan Couch, MCI VP/GM, operations. "Achieving this milestone coincides with our J4500 coach ranking as North America's best-selling intercity coach, a distinction it has enjoyed for seven years running. We take great pride in this accomplishment. We appreciate the trust our customers place in MCI models to transport their passengers in comfort, safety and reliability and the confidence they have knowing that MCI will continue to innovate and build the coaches best suited to their needs."

The Shriners and all MCI customers should notice a new trend of continuous improvement, according to the company. Internally, MCI has a number of Business Excellence programs underway including the MCI Reliability Team — a management-level taskforce emphasizing the importance and rigorous standards of quality and reliability throughout MCI's product line.

The new MCI J4500s feature a new, smooth, wide-ride suspension, electronic stability control, fire suppression system, tire-pressure monitoring and the newest clean-diesel engine technology.

Bryan Coach (left) MCI VP/GM, operations marks milestone of 6000th coach of the e/j assembly line with Shriner Care
executive Jim Harrison.
Bryan Coach (left) MCI VP/GM, operations marks milestone of 6000th coach of the e/j assembly line with Shriner Careexecutive Jim Harrison.
Based in Burnaby, B.C., the Shriners of British Columbia and Yukon operate what is now a fleet of five Shriners Care Cruisers; all MCI models that include three J4500s, an E4500 and a 102C.

The J4500s used by the Shriners Care Cruisers program require special features to transport sick children, including medical chairs that can fully recline as well as assist a patient to a standing position; wide, accessible lavatories; galleys; docking space for stretchers; hospital beds or couches; and additional HVAC equipment to make sure the coach can maintain a constant 72-degree interior even in the coldest Canadian winters. The floors are also heavily carpeted so children can play during their ride.

 

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