Bus

OCTA names new CEO

Posted on November 26, 2012

Darrell Johnson, the current deputy CEO of the Orange County Transportation Authority (OCTA), was selected by the board of directors today to become the next CEO effective March 1.

“Darrell has extensive experience in the transportation industry and an unparalleled understanding of OCTA’s vision,” said OCTA Chairman Paul Glaab. “He has been instrumental in developing and implementing OCTA’s strategic goals and we are excited he will be stepping into this new role.”

Johnson will replace CEO Will Kempton, who announced his retirement effective Feb. 28, to become the executive director of Transportation California.

Johnson joined OCTA in 2003 and has served as the deputy CEO since 2010. He helps lead OCTA on local, state, and national issues related to transportation programs and policies and assists the CEO in coordinating all business, operations and management activities among the agency’s seven divisions.

Prior to joining OCTA, Johnson worked at Amtrak for 12 years where he held positions in operations, planning and finance and contributed to the development of passenger rail services in California, Oregon, Washington and British Columbia.

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