News Tagged With: tunnel-boring-machine
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June 17, 2014

San Francisco completes tunneling work

Two TBMs excavated and constructed the Central Subway’s 1.5 mile-long tunnels at an average pace of 40 feet per day and will be retrieved in North Beach at the site of the former Pagoda Palace Theatre on Powell Street.


January 29, 2014

San Francisco tunnel boring continues progress

Beginning Tuesday, Big Alma was set to be in operation 24 hours a day to build the approximately 425 feet of new tunnel beneath the Market Street tunnels.


November 20, 2013

San Francisco MTA launches 2nd tunnel boring machine

In the coming months, the two machines will travel north under 4th Street, Stockton Street and Columbus Avenue, excavating and constructing San Francisco’s first new subway line in decades.


June 11, 2012

Toronto marks completion on first mile of boring

The new tunnels represent one complete section of the twin tunnels that will connect the future Sheppard West and Finch West Stations. The tunnel boring machines named "Holey" and "Moley" bored the tunnels.


March 21, 2012

Sound Transit completes mining first 'Link' light rail tunnel

The 21-foot diameter tunnel boring machine emerged within three millimeters of its target as part of the University Link light rail expansion.


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