Accessibility   |   Bus   |   Management & Operations   |   Motorcoach   |   Rail   |   University

April 23, 2014

N.Y. MTA testing solar-powered kiosks that provide real-time info

Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Aaron Donovan

Photo: Metropolitan Transportation Authority / Aaron Donovan

The MTA, Metro-North Railroad and New York City Transit are testing the performance and reliability of solar-powered kiosks that allow customers to access real-time train, subway and bus arrival information without connection to the electrical grid.

The two solar-powered kiosks use MTA Subway Time and MTA Bus Time to provide Metro-North customers with real-time arrival estimates for connecting subways and buses at Metro-North’s Woodlawn station. The kiosks also display Metro-North upcoming scheduled train arrivals, and they will display real-time estimates for Metro-North arrivals later this spring.

“We are pleased that despite one of the harshest winters on record, with multiple days of sub-freezing temperatures and at least a half dozen severe ice and snow storms, the kiosks have continued to operate as intended," Metro-North President Joseph Giulietti said. "These kiosks have the potential for deployment in any above-ground station where running conduits for electrical and data connectivity pose a challenge.”

RELATED: How sustainability can save transit agencies money, build support

Powered 100% by sunlight, the kiosks draw no power from the electrical grid and can remain active for 10 days without needing to be recharged by the sun. Because they are completely solar-powered and receive the real-time information wirelessly, the kiosks are not dependent on any external wiring for installation and operation. This makes them fully self-contained and easy to install with no required street closures, electrical connections or cable installation.

<p><span id=

While solar-powered kiosks are extensively used in Europe, this pilot is the one of the first fully solar-powered application displaying real-time information in the U.S.

The MTA is evaluating the performance of the kiosks to assess whether the solar panels, batteries and screens can withstand New York’s year-round weather. Kiosks are topped by a photovoltaic panel and consume 70 watt hours per day, and the screens refresh every 15 seconds.

deli.cio.us digg it stumble upon newsvine
[ Request More Info about this product / service / company ]

    There are no comments.

E-NEWSLETTER

Receive the latest Metro E-Newsletters in your inbox!

Join the Metro E-Newsletters and receive the latest news in your e-mail inbox once a week. SIGN UP NOW!

View the latest eNews
Express Tuesday | Express Thursday | University Transit

White Papers

Mass Transit Capital Planning An overview of the world-class best practices for assessing, prioritizing, and funding capital projects to optimize resources and align with the organization’s most critical immediate and long-term goals.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Service in ADA Complementary Paratransit Many U.S. transit agencies continue to struggle with the quality of ADA service, the costs, and the difficulties encountered in contracting the service, which is the method of choice for a significant majority of agencies. One of the most basic policy decisions an agency must make involves whether to provide door-to-door, or only curb-to-curb service.

Mass transit mobile Wi-Fi & the public sector case study How Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority successfully implemented Wi-Fi on its light rail and bus lines

More white papers


 
DIGITAL EDITION

The full contents of Metro Magazine on your computer! The digital edition is an exact replica of the print magazine with enhanced search, multimedia and hyperlink features. View the current issue