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February 14, 2014

University campuses lead way in reducing driving

As Millennials lead a national shift away from driving, universities like Oregon State University and the city of Corvallis are giving students new options for getting around and becoming innovators in transportation policy, according to a new report released today. The report, titled, “A New Course: How Innovative University Programs Are Reducing Driving on Campus and Creating New Models for Transportation Policy,” was released by OSPIRG Foundation.

“Here in Oregon and across America, colleges and universities are showing that efforts to meet increased demand for transportation options deliver powerful benefits for their community and surrounding areas," said OSPIRG Foundation's Evan Preston. “These efforts are saving money for universities, and improving the quality of life on campus.”

Americans aged 16 to 34 years of age reduced their annual driving miles by 23 percent per person between 2001 and 2009, according to research based on the most recent data from the Federal Highway Administration that is included in the study.

As Baby Boomers grow older, Millennials have become America’s largest generation. Since government investments in transportation infrastructure often last decades, the question of whether current investment will match the needs of future travelers depends largely on how well Millennials’ preferences will be met.

“University and college campuses are at the forefront of encouraging news ways to get around that don’t depend on personal cars. Public officials who want to stay ahead of the curve should be taking notes,” said Preston.

The report describes how universities are improving their communities by providing a wider range of transportation choices. This includes buses, biking, various types of vehicle-sharing that makes it easier not to have a personal car, and convenient apps that make it easier to navigate the options. The report also documents how campuses seek to avoid the steep costs of building additional parking facilities.

“Universities have a lot in common with cities,” added Preston. “They must get the most value out of limited land, they are acutely aware of problems associated with being overrun by cars; and they need to focus on the tastes and aspirations of young people. It’s no wonder that universities are leaders in finding successful ways to make it easier for people to drive less.”

Find the full report here: “New Course: How Innovative University Programs Are Reducing Driving on Campus and Creating New Models for Transportation Policy.”



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  • Matt M[ February 17th, 2014 @ 8:03am ]

    Students (as well as faculty and staff) of Oregon State University aren't avoiding driving because of their "tastes and aspirations," they're avoiding it because the University itself as well as the City of Corvallis are actively hostile towards driving, and intentionally make it as difficult as possible for commuters to do so. Admit a ton of students, hire a ton of staff, refuse to create more parking spaces or road capacity, charge exorbitant prices for parking, and yeah, fewer people will drive. But that doesn't mean tastes or attitudes have changed. It just means that people are no longer willing to put up with the ridiculous hassle that onerous policies have created.

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