Government Issues

How sustainability can save transit agencies money, build community support

Posted on November 18, 2013 by David Walsh

Everyone in the public transit world knows resources are always stretched. But, there are ways agencies can use sustainability to create and maintain financial, social and political capital.

Efficiency plays well with the public and can save big money in the long run. Often, the environmental choices transit agencies face are governed by local laws that vary greatly across the country.

Let’s focus the sustainability lens on some of the biggest operational costs in public works projects: fuel, power and water.

Energy-saving practices
I am working with a major city that is  building out a large transit project. We decided to use a new generation of compact ceramic metal halide lamps in thousands of lamps throughout the parking lots and stations. The energy savings over time will more than justify the initial price. That is sustainable and sensible thinking that will pay financial and environmental dividends for decades.

Other energy-saving practices include escalators with motion sensors, regenerative elevators and sub-metering at maintenance facilities.

Fueling fleets
On the fuel side, hybrid buses and compressed natural gas (CNG) have proven track records of reducing costs and carbon pollution. The CNG bus fleet at the Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority reduced more than 92% of air toxic pollutants compared to the diesel buses it once operated. And, depending on the relative costs of natural gas and oil, CNG costs about one-quarter to one-half of the equivalent of diesel.

Water management
Water is increasingly considered a scarce resource, and transit agencies are often presented choices where sustainability can provide good guide posts. Planting native or adapted vegetation around stations and park-and-ride lots requires less potable water for irrigation. Re-circulating water in bus washes saves thousands of gallons as well as dollars.

The storm water side of the equation is even more active and often directed by local regulations and priorities. In Seattle, for example, the public utility determines storm drainage rates by surface area and types of surface, with special allowances for pervious surfaces. The City of Philadelphia took particularly strong action, committing to refurbishing 9,500 acres of paved lands as part of a $2 billion plan to comply with Federal orders to fix combined drainage and sewage systems that can discharge raw sewage and contaminant-laced runoff into the Delaware and Schuylkill Rivers.

The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA), which provides public transit for five Pennsylvania counties including Philadelphia, set a target of 10% improvement in SEPTA’s water use and pollutant discharge performance by 2015. The agency plans to achieve this target by reducing its impervious surfaces on its properties and other strategies.

Just as storm water sustainability is often governed by local laws, so is the disposal of construction debris. In the Seattle area, tipping fees are far higher at landfills than recycling centers, a big incentive for local transit agencies to aggressively separate construction debris to maximize recyclables and minimize landfill waste.

Just as sustainable water, fuel and energy practices can build financial resources, sustainability can also replenish and augment social and political resources as well as help set the stage for an electorate more supportive of transit.

Good storm water management can prevent accidental releases of contaminated water, which can result in fines and public outrage. Good dust and noise control can help reduce the annoyance factor. And, strategic lighting can save money and limit neighborhood light pollution.

Embrace new solutions
Of course, sustainability often means doing something new, untried and experimental. For every reason to make a change, there are counter arguments.  Doing limited pilot projects to vet new solutions positions agencies as both forward-thinkers and responsible stewards undertaking due diligence.

Transit agencies have to maintain a tricky balance between embracing new solutions that can deliver increased efficiencies without increasing risk. Interestingly, I have found innovation is often embraced by the both high-level leadership and younger, newer staff. It will be this new generation that will likely devise and implement sustainable practices most transit agencies haven’t even dreamed of yet.

David Walsh, a LEED-accredited architect with experience with both design and construction, is a project manager with Sellen Sustainability.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

FRA takes follow-up action to control Northeast Corridor train speed

The order is the latest in a series of actions the FRA has taken in the wake of last week’s derailment of Amtrak Train #188.

Secretary Foxx tours L.A. Metro, touts infrastructure

The stop was part of Foxx's tour of projects throughout the country to highlight the nation’s third annual Infrastructure Week, which brings together thousands of stakeholders across the country to highlight the importance of investing in America’s infrastructure, and to encourage Congress to act on a long-term transportation bill.

'Infrastructure Week' to highlight need for long-term fed investment

In support of the third annual Infrastructure Week, U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx participated in kickoff events in Washington, D.C. yesterday and will then head out to meet with state and local leaders, business leaders, and academics in Tennessee, California and Iowa.

APTA lauds 'Stand Up' Campaign, Expects Short-Term Fed Funding Fix

FTA Acting Administrator Therese McMillan highlighted a few programs that have been created to help fill the needs of the industry, including the FTA’s Ladders of Opportunity initiative, which made available $100 million in grants for transit agencies to modernize and expand transit bus service specifically for the purpose of connecting disadvantaged and low-income individuals, veterans, seniors, youths, and others with local workforce training, employment centers, healthcare and other vital services.

Americans support gas tax hike, spending revenue on public transit, survey says

One of the proposed federal bills, H.R. 1846, would index the gas tax to inflation and create a bi-partisan, bi-cameral transportation commission that would provide long-term funding of the Highway Trust Fund. Another proposed bill, H.R. 680, would increase the gas tax by five cents per year for three years.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close