Government Issues

Pub Perspective: Will the U.S. ever address infrastructure?

Posted on June 17, 2016 by James Blue

The Rapid
 
The Rapid
 

As I write this, another annual Infrastructure Week recognition has just passed in Washington, D.C., yet it doesn’t seem to matter. If anything, this year’s publicity was even less than last year’s. Once again, while everyone agrees that funding for infrastructure, including for public transportation, must be increased dramatically, and most agree on the reasons, too few in D.C. are willing to raise taxes, cut spending elsewhere or borrow money at record low interest rates to pay for the investments.

States and cities are doing what they can
States and cities are attempting to increase their funding, but because the recession so deeply affected them many continue to struggle. According to the Pew Foundation, previously sacrosanct spending on police and fire protection as well as education is still behind pre-recession levels in most states. In fact, transportation spending has, for the most part, fared better than these other areas.

True, voters in many states and localities have agreed to bigger public transportation investments, at approval rates that average greater than 70% for more than two decades now. This trend has limits, however. First, many are now reaching levels of self-taxation that may not get much higher. Second, because of state legal limits, many have no dedicated funding for public transportation and some cannot go to voters directly for the increases. That is because many have firewalls built into their state constitutions against spending the money on anything other than roads.

In one of the few states that can use gas tax revenues for transit, California proves that this is no panacea. The California Transportation Commission’s  new five-year state transportation funding plan just released cuts of $754 million and delays another $755 million in previously programmed surface transportation spending because of the loss of gas tax revenue in the wake of lower gasoline prices. It is the largest such reduction in the past two decades. And, this is a state that has acted to take up the slack in federal spending more than many others.

Lack of consensus has already led to disaster
Such underfunding and inaction has already exposed the problems that we will face if we do not own up to the hundreds of billions of dollars needed just to maintain the system that we have. Washington’s Metro system, which will shut down in segments throughout the balance of the year for safety-related repairs that have been deferred in some cases for decades, is a stark reminder of what’s at stake, but it hasn’t been the only life-threatening example of aging infrastructure. A failed bridge over the Skagit River in the Seattle area is another. Hurricane Katrina exposed the nation to what a city faces when it underfunded levees. Flint, Mich. exposed a city’s residents to lead poisoning when the state’s governor and legislature decided to scrimp on waterworks spending.

Does anyone seriously believe that keeping taxes at their lowest levels in half a century has a greater impact on future economic growth than paying the infrastructure repair bill now long overdue?

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Senate confirms Batory as FRA administrator

Additionally, it was announced that Thelma Drake has been nominated to be administrator of the Federal Transit Administration.

Martinez confirmed to lead FMCSA

As the country’s top commercial motor vehicle regulator, Administrator Martinez will oversee a multitude of issues ranging from a complete overhaul of CSA’s safety performance scoring program to the introduction of electronic logging devices.

Transportation industry responds to President's infrastructure plan

ITS America announced the formation of its Smart Infrastructure Task Force to address how technology and innovation can be incentivized.

FRA deputy administrator resigns over questions about 'outside work'

Heath Hall, a public relations professional and political consultant who served as a spokesman for a sheriff’s office in Mississippi, reportedly continued work at his public relations firm while also working for the FRA.

President releases $1.5 trillion infrastructure plan

Allocates $100 billion for a grant competition with preference given to applicants that raise revenue such as taxes, fees or tolls, and would limit federal help to 20% of new money generated.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Luxury Coach & Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close