Government Issues

Rochester, N.Y. receives $15M train station grant

Posted on August 8, 2013

U.S. Transportation Secretary Anthony Foxx announced the obligation of a $15 million grant to design and construct a new train station in Rochester, N.Y. The project is one of 47 transportation projects in 34 states and the District of Columbia selected to receive funding under the U.S. Department of Transportation’s highly competitive $500 million TIGER (Transportation Investment Generating Economic Recovery) 2012 program.

“This grant will give Rochester a modern train station that will connect residents to all of New York and New England, whether they’re traveling by train, bus or car,” said Secretary Foxx. “Projects like this offer more transit options to more people, opening doors to opportunities both near and far.”

The grant to New York State Department of Transportation (NYSDOT), announced in June 2012, is for the final design and construction of a new, 12,000-square-foot station that will include a high-level island passenger platform, an underground concourse for pedestrian and baggage access to the new platform, two new dedicated passenger sidings, and additional track and signal work.

It will improve access to Amtrak’s Empire Service from New York City to Niagara Falls; the Maple Leaf from New York City to Toronto; the Lake Shore Limited from New York City/Boston to Chicago; and connections to other modes of transportation, such as Greyhound and Trailways bus services, Rochester Regional Transit Service buses and taxis.

Obligation of the funds means the NYSDOT has successfully met the rigorous engineering, environmental and contractual TIGER requirements for project readiness. The new station, which will be fully compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA), will replace a temporary station constructed in 1978, which is deteriorating and non-ADA compliant.

NYSDOT is contributing $7.5 million to the project and the city of Rochester is contributing $500,000. Award of the NYSDOT contract for the project is expected in the fall of 2013 with construction expected to begin in spring 2014.

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