Government Issues

FMCSA proposes drug, alcohol testing clearinghouse

Posted on February 12, 2014

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) proposed a rule to establish a drug and alcohol clearinghouse for all national commercial driver's license (CDL) holders.

The clearinghouse would help improve roadway safety by making it easier to determine whether a bus or truck driver is prohibited from operating a commercial motor vehicle for failing to comply with federal drug and alcohol regulations, including mandatory testing.

Current federal regulations require employers to conduct mandatory pre-employment screening of a CDL driver's qualifications based upon his or her driving record. However, there has not been a single federal repository recording positive drug and alcohol tests by CDL holders that employers would be able to search to ensure that the driver is able to perform safety-sensitive duties.

The proposed rule would create such a repository and require employers to conduct pre-employment searches for all new CDL drivers and annual searches on current drivers.

"We are leveraging technology to create a one-stop verification point to help companies hire drug and alcohol-free drivers," said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. "This proposal moves us further down the road toward improving safety for truck and bus companies, commercial drivers and the motoring public everywhere."

Under the proposed rule, FMCSA-regulated bus and truck; medical review officers; substance abuse professionals; and private, third-party U.S. Department of Transportation (U.S. DOT) drug and alcohol testing laboratories would be required to record information about a driver who:

  • Fails a drug and/or alcohol test.
  • Refuses to submit to a drug and/or alcohol test.
  • Successfully completes a substance abuse program and is legally qualified to return to duty.

Private, third-party U.S. DOT drug and alcohol testing laboratories also would be required to report summary information annually. This information would be used to help identify companies that do not have a testing program.

To ensure the privacy of drivers involved, each CDL holder would need to provide his or her consent, before an employer could access the clearinghouse.

Drivers who refuse to provide this information could still be employed by the bus or truck company; however, they could not occupy safety-sensitive positions, such as operating a commercial motor vehicle.

To view a copy of the Federal Register announcement, click here.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

New Yorkers have longest workweek with commute, study says

The study found that lower-wage workers often endure the most brutal commutes, and the findings suggest a need for workplace policies that help to balance work and family life, in addition to better investment in our mass transit system.

FRA announces right-of-way fatality, trespass prevention workshop

The conference agenda is currently being developed by a team of industry experts and will cover five key areas: community outreach and education; enforcement; design, technology and infrastructure; intentional acts/deaths; and pedestrian safety.

Ill. House Rep. calls for full funding of transit & passenger rail

Rep. Mike Quigley (D-IL), member of the House Appropriations Subcommittee on Transportation, Housing and Urban Development and Related Agencies, led a bipartisan letter to the THUD Subcommittee with 10 members of the Illinois House delegation urging full funding for mass transit and passenger rail in next year’s THUD budget.

Gov.'s budget proposes $169M cut in Chicago transit funding

The proposed cuts represent a 45% decrease in CTA state funding or a $130 million cut; a 60% decrease in Metra state funding or a $20.8 million cut; a 41% decrease in Pace state funding or a $10 million cut; and a 15% decrease in ADA paratransit state funding or $8.5 million cut.

FTA awards Fla. BRT project $26M grant

The 9.4-mile Jacksonville Transportation Authority's North Corridor line is the second segment of a five-phased First Coast Flyer BRT system planned for the area. It will connect to the first BRT line in downtown Jacksonville now under construction and extend north to Interstate 295.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

Please sign in or register to .    Close