Government Issues

Indy zoning law aims to curb parking, boost transit and car-sharing use

Posted on July 17, 2015

An IndyGo bus travels downtown.
An IndyGo bus travels downtown.

INDIANAPOLIS — City planners are offering developers huge savings — tens of thousands of dollars on large projects — by reducing the required number of parking spaces for some developments if bike racks, electric-car charging stations or other "green" amenities are offered instead as a way to encourage use alternative transportation options such buses, bicycles and car-sharing, the Indianapolis Star reported.

The change is included in the recent overhaul of the county's 1969 zoning code, called Indy Rezone, which aims to improve walkability and transportation options in the city and increase greenspace, the report said.

Other cities, such as Portland and Boston, have relaxed parking requirements with mixed success. Earlier this year, Seattle went a step further and required developers to offer residents bus passes or bikeshare memberships instead of parking spaces, according to the Indianapolis Star.

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