Topic : blind spots

1 - 6 of 6

NJ Transit unveils plan to install 360-degree cameras on buses

Security and Safety | May 18, 2017

The $29.1 million system will be installed in 2,500 new and existing buses to provide operators with a 360-degree field of vision around the bus that will help to eliminate blind spots and enhance pedestrian safety.

Feds make $7M available for innovations to improve public transit

Government Issues| August 16, 2016

FTA is looking for state-of-the-art safety solutions, including automated warning systems that help bus operators avoid collisions, detect obstructions in their path or vehicle design improvements to reduce bus operator blind spots.

June 1, 2016

Still Blaming Bus-Pedestrian Contact On the A-Pillar/Mirror Design?

I have had it with the never-ending meeting of the minds on the predominant causes of left-turn bus-pedestrian collisions. This whole issue is getting obscured with presentations that slice and dice every possible cause of these incidents into a collection of symbols, numbers and formulas. Please stop.

Bus| May 17, 2016

Seon Brings 360° Vision to School Bus & Transit Fleets

The inView 360 Around Vehicle Monitoring (AVM) System eliminates dangerous vehicle blind spots that threaten student and pedestrian safety is now available for the school bus and transit fleet markets.

November 23, 2015

Key Steps to Managing Left-Turning Buses and Pedestrian Safety

Bus operators are not blindfolded. Operators are trained and required to identify potential hazards, based on their forward planning skills. With regard to left turns, these so called “blind spots” are really areas behind the left A-pillar/mirror that are “temporarily” obstructed to the operator, not blind to the operator. The key here is for the operators to utilize their observation and forward planning skills to minimize the time that their vision is temporarily obstructed. The pedestrian that regrettably becomes a victim of bus contact should be in the clear view of the operator long before arriving at the location where the contact occurred. Pedestrians are not “coming out of nowhere!"

November 11, 2015

How Effective Scanning Helps Bus Operators See Potential Driving Hazards

The world is a very busy place. We rely on our eyes to provide us with information that will keep us from harm as we operate our vehicles. It is difficult to over-emphasize the importance of effective scanning in order to recognize potential hazards early enough so appropriate action can be taken to avoid conflict. As a result, we spend a lot of time advising operators how often they should scan their mirrors, where to look for hazards, and how to bring objects into view that may be temporarily obstructed, and so on.

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation