Management & Operations

More Integrated Fare Systems Due?

Posted on November 9, 1999

With its MetroCard, New York became the first multimodal system in North America to implement a retrofitted integrated fare collection technology that could be used on both its bus and rail systems. Now it looks that more cities are about to get into the act. Recently, the Metropolitan Atlanta (Ga.) Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) took a page from the Big Apple’s playbook and issued a request for proposal for new fare collection technology that also will encompass both buses as well as the city’s heavy rail system. In the future, say MARTA officials, it might also encompass regional public transport services of the newly created Greater Atlanta Regional Transportation Authority. Bids for the huge contract, which also encompasses new fare media, data collection and system maintenance, are due to MARTA in January with a winner announced later in 2000. Competition and interest in the contract is intense; the prebid conference alone drew approximately 100 companies. Such large-scale integration projects appear to be the next wave in the fare collection marketplace. “This is being driven by transit properties’ desire to have a seamless system that passengers can use with one card,” says Kim Green, vice president of sales and marketing for GFI Genfare. “It’s also driven by their desire for compatible electronic fare media, whether magnetic or smart cards.” Virtually every large multimodal city in the U.S. is said to be examining this approach, including Washington, D.C., Philadelphia and Boston. Seattle, a virtual start-up with both new bus and rail networks overlaid on the existing multimodal system, is also looking at it, but, like Los Angeles and San Francisco, it faces an additional challenge of both new and existing infrastructure under management of multiple agencies. What’s also interesting about these new contracts, Green says, is that they are stimulating the formation of partnerships in consortia, drawing upon the expertise of more than a single company. It is very much like what has gone on in new rail lines, especially turnkey projects, he points out. Of course, the logical conclusion of this trend is what has happened in London and Hong Kong,” Green adds. In both cities private consortia are responsible for the design, manufacture, installation, operation and maintenance of multimodal fare collection technology. The British government is expected to save billions of pounds in both the upgrade job and the efficiencies that the new system, being managed by a consortium called PRESTIGE, is projected to generate. In Hong Kong, the Creative Star Consortium responsible for its new smart card system actually turns a profit and earns money for the country’s bus and rail operators. Will such a scheme come to U.S. shores? Eventually, predicts Green, but first things first. “It’s a more slowly evolving situation thank many people think,” he says, adding: “Five years ago smart cards were supposed to take over the industry, and we’re still waiting to see them get out of the pilot project phase.”

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

King County Metro, Intersection extend advertising contract

The agency first tapped Intersection in 2005, when, operating as Titan, the company won a competitive contract granting the exclusive rights to sell advertising on its 1,400 buses and facilities

BAI Communications acquires inMOTION Wireless

In 2014, inMOTION was awarded an exclusive 22-year license by Boston’s MBTA to design, build, finance, and operate a multi-application high-speed network along the MBTA Commuter Rail System and on MBTA ferries.

Calif.'s Big Blue Bus rolls out mobile ticketing app

The program will be evaluated after a six-month period to determine whether customers feel that the app fare payment is beneficial, in addition to BBB staff determining the cost/benefit of adding the app to BBB’s suite of fare media products.

Pace mourns death of Bolton, former deputy exec. director

He passed away in the early hours of April 15, 2017, after battling pancreatic cancer. He was 69.

CATA CEO Draggoo announces plan to retire

She is currently the longest-serving transit CEO in the nation. Her career with the authority spans 43 years, 32 of them as CATA’s CEO.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close