Management & Operations

TSA security measures for U.S. rail go into effect

Posted on May 24, 2004

Federal mandates for increased security on the nation's subway and rail systems went into effect Sunday. Protective measures include using bomb-sniffing dogs and removing or replacing trash cans. "Travelers may not see any difference, but they should feel a greater confidence that there are minimum security standards in place," said Asa Hutchison, undersecretary for border and transportation security at the Department of Homeland Security. The new security mandates, announced last Thursday, are a response to the Madrid commuter train bombings. Other new security requirements for light rail systems, inter-city passenger rail systems such as Amtrak, commuter rail operations, as well as subway systems nationwide include: - Training for all rail personnel in preventing and responding to potential terrorists events. - Check rail cars for unattended packages, and using bomb-sniffing dogs as needed. - Remove trash cans, or replace with clear plastic or bomb-resistant containers. - Increase staffing during heightened security alerts. The security directives will be administered by the Transportation Security Administration.

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