San Francisco to charge employee shuttle operators to use stops

Posted on January 14, 2014 by Alex Roman, Managing Editor

Photo courtesy SFMTA
Photo courtesy SFMTA
Employee shuttle buses for Silicon Valley tech firms, which have become a symbol of income disparity in San Francisco, will soon be charged for using public bus stops. The agreement, which had been in the works for months and was announced in early January, took on added urgency as protesters blocked Google buses in San Francisco and Oakland, according to a San Francisco Chronicle report.

Following more than a year of collaborative work, the group, which includes the San Francisco Municipal Transportation Agency (SFMTA), Mayor Ed Lee, Genentech, Google, Apple, Facebook, Bauer’s Intelligent Transportation and the Bay Area Council, came to a broad consensus on a package of policy recommendations allowing commuter shuttles to use a limited network of approved Muni zones, as part of an 18-month pilot program.

The pilot program includes:

  • Charging a daily fee based on the number of stops a shuttle provider or employer makes to fully cover the SFMTA’s cost of administering and enforcing the program and includes private investment to improve select stops. Fees are estimated to raise tens of thousands of dollars monthly to the largest transportation providers.
  • Approval of 200 bus stops to be used by providers.
  • Private shuttle providers will pay to use Muni bus zones, based on a per stop, per day, cost recovery schedule. Due to Proposition 218, the SFMTA cannot create a fee structure that goes beyond the cost to provide such a service or policy.
  • Providers would operate in accordance to agreed-upon guidelines, such as yielding to Muni and pulling to the front of the zone making more room for other vehicles and avoiding steep and narrow streets.
  • The agency would enforce these rules to ensure only participating companies are using shared zones. It will be illegal to use all other bus zones.
  • Each commuter shuttle will be issued a unique identification placard so enforcement personnel can easily identify vehicles.
  • Providers would share data with SFMTA to ensure that location information is available for complaint follow-up, enforcement and to support the agency’s transportation system management.

“How we deal with shuttles now is not sustainable and this proposal gives the board an opportunity to vote on a policy that increases safety, reduces impacts on Muni, provides more information, improves the flow of traffic and reduces driving simultaneously,” said Tom Nolan, chairman of the SFMTA board of directors.

Currently, issues are resolved on a case-by-case basis, which is not sustainable or effective in managing this mode of transportation. The private shuttles predominantly use Muni bus zones, without any coordination with Muni and this can lead to delays on the transit system.

The city does not have complete information about which shuttles operate where and this makes it difficult and time consuming to follow up on inquiries and complaints.

The proposal was set to be taken to the SFMTA board in late January. If the board takes action, the SFMTA will ask shuttle providers to propose stops for inclusion into the bus zone network and will ask San Francisco residents for their input to determine specific bus zones that can be used. Final plans would then be approved by public hearing in late spring.

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