Motorcoach

N.Y. permit system to regulate intercity buses

Posted on June 19, 2012

Passage of new legislation that would create a permitting system for intercity buses in New York City was announced in mid-June, giving the city new authority to regulate the industry and designate pick-up and drop-off locations.

Intercity buses have created problems on many city streets by causing congestion, blocking access to intersections and sidewalks, forcing people to walk in the street, and creating dangerous conditions by double- and triple-parking, according to announced New York Assembly Speaker Sheldon Silver. By designating pick-up and drop-off locations, the city will be able to bring some order to the situation and will give local communities the chance to have input on where bus stops will be established.

"While providing a convenient, inexpensive alternative for intercity travel, these buses have often caused chaos on our city streets by blocking intersections, endangering pedestrians, and idling, which causes pollution," said Silver. "This permitting system will help alleviate some of that congestion and bring greater accountability to the intercity bus industry."

The measure (A.4578-A/Silver) amends the vehicle and traffic law to authorize New York City to establish an intercity bus permit system. The new system would designate streets and locations on those streets for passenger loading and unloading. It would also allow for community and public feedback before selecting bus stop locations, and would provide continuous information to the public through the online posting of approved bus applications and intercity bus stops.

It would also require that permit applications include identification of the intercity bus company and identification of the specific buses being used. Low-cost intercity buses have been involved in a number of accidents and several companies were recently shut down by the federal government over safety violations. This bill is part of a federal, state and local effort to bring stricter oversight to the industry, which has expanded rapidly over the past 15 years.

Sen. Daniel Squadron said, "Passage of intercity bus permit legislation in both houses of the legislature is a big step toward protecting communities and passengers alike as the low-cost bus industry continues to grow. City permits for intercity buses will help end Chinatown's wild west atmosphere while allowing the city and state to identify problems before they become tragedies."

Penalties for intercity buses that load or unload passengers on City streets either without a permit or in violation of permit requirements or restrictions would consist of a fine of up to $1,000 for a first violation, up to $2,500 for repeat violations, and permit suspension or revocation.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

ABA, AAA implore leaders to address DC parking crisis

The groups urged planners to add parking near the National Mall for the millions of people who will visit by bus and car over the next several months, kicking off with the National Cherry Blossom Festival.

UMA operators hold 418 appointments during 'Capitol Hill Days'

In their meetings, UMA members shared information about their own businesses and rallied for backing of three critical needs: opposition of FMCSA's proposal to raise the Federal financial responsibility limits, support of Rep. Barletta's proposal  to remove CSA scores from public view until the data used to calculate the score can be improved, and support to preserve the current charter service rule.

Trailways taps Outstanding Motorcoach Driver of the Year

David Cooper of Pacific Coachways Trailways in Garden Grove, Calif., was presented by Bob Crescenzo, VP, safety & loss control, at Lancer Insurance, the awards event sponsor.

Chinatown bus passengers attack driver

State police said the driver did not speak or understand English and did not know he was supposed to stop in Richmond, Va. The driver was reportedly dragged out of his chair, while the bus was swerving in and out of lanes for a half mile or so.

ABA names new VP, Government Affairs

Suzanne Te Beau Rohde will succeed ABA's sr. VP, Government Affairs and Policy, Clyde Hart, who is retiring after 14 years.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close