Motorcoach

FMCSA shuts down 2 Mass. operators

Posted on April 1, 2014

The Federal Motor Carrier Safety Administration (FMCSA) revoked the operating authority of two Massachusetts-based bus companies for disregarding federal safety regulations and putting their drivers, passengers and the motoring public at risk.

Thus far in 2014, FMCSA has revoked the operating authority of more than 75 unsafe bus and truck companies. A total of eight motor carriers and four commercial drivers have been declared to be imminent hazards to public safety.

“FMCSA inspectors and safety investigators across the nation are focused on protecting the motoring public from needless harm,” said FMCSA Administrator Anne S. Ferro. “Our goal is to stop a preventable bus or truck crash from ever occurring.”

The two passenger carriers ordered shut-down by FMCSA are:

  • Crystal Transport Inc., Boston

In February 2014, FMCSA investigators conducted a compliance review of Crystal Transport and discovered continuing serious violations and non-compliance with previously identified federal safety regulations. The company was given a 30-day period to provide evidence demonstrating that it was operating in compliance with safety regulations and that its federal operating authority should not be revoked. Examples of continuing violations cited by FMCSA investigators included evidence that three drivers, all of whom had tested positive for controlled substances, had been allowed to transport passengers for most of 2013. In addition, falsified records-of-duty were discovered as was evidence of drivers being required or permitted to drive far in excess of hours-of-service restrictions.

The company failed to respond within the 30-day period. On March 19, 2014, FMCSA ordered Crystal Transport to stop operating in interstate commerce. To view a copy of the order revoking operating authority registration, click here.

  • Pandora Travel Inc., Lawrence, Mass.

In February 2014, FMCSA investigators conducted a compliance review of Pandora Travel and discovered continuing serious violations and non-compliance with previously identified federal safety regulations. The company was provided a 30-day period to provide evidence demonstrating that it was operating in compliance with safety regulations and that its federal operating authority should not be revoked. Examples of continuing violations cited by FMCSA investigators were numerous speeding and traffic violations incurred by Pandora’s drivers over a period of years and throughout 2013. Through roadside violations and comparison of drivers’ records-of-duty, FMCSA investigators found numerous instances of drivers’ exceeding the posted speed limit. The company took no disciplinary action in some instances and allowed the individuals to continue to transport passengers.

The company responded but failed to demonstrate compliance with federal safety regulations. On March 26, 2014, FMCSA ordered Pandora Travel to stop operating in interstate commerce. To view a copy of the order revoking operating authority registration, click here.

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