June 16, 2009

IC Bus prices to increase by $6K

The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) will implement more stringent emissions requirements for on-highway diesel engines beginning in January 2010. As a result, the price of buses built by Navistar subsidiary IC Bus with these new engines coming in 2010 will increase $6,000 per unit.

 

“IC Bus understands that many bus customers have fixed budgets and we recognize that a price increase will have an impact on them,” said John McKinney, president, IC Bus. “Through more efficient sourcing and manufacturing operations, we have worked diligently to minimize the design and development costs so that 2010 engine prices are as manageable as possible for our customers. And, while our engines will not have the addition of extra aftertreatment equipment like competitors choosing SCR, we’ve invested heavily into the development of a non-urea solution and meeting the stricter emissions levels carries a higher price.”

 

To meet the 2010 EPA emissions requirements for on-highway diesel engines, IC Bus school and commercial buses will be powered by MaxxForce Advanced EGR (exhaust gas recirculation) engines with proven technologies, including advanced fuel injection, air management, electronic controls and proprietary combustion technology.

 

This pricing impacts all IC Bus school bus models (the BE Series, CE Series, FE Series and RE Series) and commercial models (including the HC Series and LC Series).

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