October 2, 2009

MARTA launches color-coded rail system

On Thursday, the Metropolitan Atlanta Rapid Transit Authority (MARTA) launched a color-coded rail-line identification system that’s designed to help transit riders more easily navigate the system.

 

The changes coincide with the implementation of a 25-cent base fare increase and an additional $1 for parking at MARTA lots, austerity measures that were approved by MARTA’s board of directors to help ensure the future of transit in metro Atlanta.

 

Under the new identification system, main rail lines – and their deviating branches – will be identified by four primary colors. The changes will minimize confusion, especially for first-time customers, and those traveling on lines that split as well as visitors from other cities who are likely more accustomed to color-coded rail systems. Transit systems across the country typically identify rail lines by color rather than the “end-of-line” designations MARTA currently uses.

 

The changes in the rail line identification system are part of an overall update of MARTA’s graphic standards. The new standards will eventually be incorporated throughout the system as vehicles and system equipment are rehabilitated or replaced. MARTA will also be revising its written materials to make it easier and simpler for riders to use the system.

 

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