December 22, 2009

APTA: Ridership drop reflects harsh economy

With high unemployment, significant decreases in gasoline prices, and less state and local revenue available for public transportation operations, public transit ridership declined by 3.8 percent in the first nine months of 2009 compared to record levels in the same period last year, according to APTA. Trips on all of the major modes of public transportation — bus, light rail, heavy rail and commuter rail — were down; paratransit (demand response) and trolleybus were the only two modes that saw increases in ridership.

“This downturn in public transportation ridership is a reflection of our economic times,” said APTA President William Millar. “Nearly 60 percent of riders take public transportation to commute to and from work, so it is to be expected that public transit ridership would be lower when unemployment is high.”

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics, unemployment accelerated monthly from January through September 2009, reaching 9.8 percent in September. This is 58 percent higher than the unemployment rate for September 2008.

Drops in local and state funding have seriously impacted public transit system budgets and in many cases, this has led to reduced service and/or higher fares.

Last June, APTA released a national survey that showed that more than 80 percent of public transit systems had seen flat or decreased funding from state, local and regional revenues. Among transit systems facing this decreased funding, 89 percent of transit systems were forced to raise fares or cut service. Additionally, among those transit systems facing revenue declines, almost one-half of them (47 percent) reported both raising fares and cutting service to address funding shortfalls.

Paratransit (demand response) and trolleybus were the only two modes that saw increases in ridership. Paratransit ridership increased by 3.7 percent and trolleybus ridership increased by 0.7 percent from January through September 2009.
 
Light rail (streetcars, trolleys) had a slight decrease less than one percent (-0.7). Light rail systems in seven cities reported an increase in the first nine months: Philadelphia  (17.5 percent); Oceanside, Calif. (17.3 percent); Baltimore (13.9 percent); Memphis, Tenn. (11.6 percent); Tampa, Fla. (7.0 percent); San Francisco (1.1percent). A new line on the light rail system in Seattle, has led to more than 100 percent growth in the first nine months of 2009.

Heavy rail (subways) declined by three percent. Los Angeles Metro heavy rail continued its trend of increased ridership with an increase of six percent for the first nine months. Ridership on the Washington Metropolitan Transportation Authority (WMATA) increased by 0.6 percent for the same time period.

Commuter rail ridership decreased by 5.1 percent. Commuter rail ridership increases were recorded in the following cities: Boston (2.4 percent); New Haven, Conn. (1.4 percent); and Alexandria, Va. (1.3 percent). A major extension of commuter rail in New Mexico from Albuquerque to Santa Fe led to more than a 100 percent increase from January through September 2009.

Bus ridership declined by five percent in the first nine months of 2009. In the largest bus ridership report, bus trips increased in San Francisco by 1.1 percent. Bus travel in the smallest population area (below 100,000) decreased by only one percent — the smallest percent decrease of all population groups.

To see the complete APTA ridership report, visit this page.

deli.cio.us digg it stumble upon newsvine
[ Request More Info about this product / service / company ]


E-NEWSLETTER

Receive the latest Metro E-Newsletters in your inbox!

Join the Metro E-Newsletters and receive the latest news in your e-mail inbox once a week. SIGN UP NOW!

View the latest eNews
Express Tuesday | Express Thursday | University Transit

White Papers

Mass Transit Capital Planning An overview of the world-class best practices for assessing, prioritizing, and funding capital projects to optimize resources and align with the organization’s most critical immediate and long-term goals.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Service in ADA Complementary Paratransit Many U.S. transit agencies continue to struggle with the quality of ADA service, the costs, and the difficulties encountered in contracting the service, which is the method of choice for a significant majority of agencies. One of the most basic policy decisions an agency must make involves whether to provide door-to-door, or only curb-to-curb service.

Mass transit mobile Wi-Fi & the public sector case study How Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority successfully implemented Wi-Fi on its light rail and bus lines

More white papers


STORE
METRO Magazine - June 2013

METRO Magazine
Here are the Highlight:
  • Top Rail Survey
  • SunRail to Transform Florida’s Commuter Culture
  • Smaller Systems Face Fleet, Expansion Issues
    And much more…
  •  
    DIGITAL EDITION

    The full contents of Metro Magazine on your computer! The digital edition is an exact replica of the print magazine with enhanced search, multimedia and hyperlink features. View the current issue