May 11, 2011

Chicago Transit to install LED signs at bus shelters

The Chicago Transit Authority's (CTA) board approved the purchase of 160 light emitting diode (LED) signs to be installed at select bus shelters throughout the city. The LED signs will display Bus Tracker estimated arrival time information.

The signs will be strategically placed at bus stops, with at least one in each ward and where higher numbers of boardings occur, and also at busy transfer and connection locations.

"LED displays are yet another method by which customers can get estimated bus arrival times," said CTA President Richard L. Rodriguez. "Currently, Bus Tracker times are available on desktop computers and Web-enabled mobile devices. Thanks to RTA and FTA grants, the agency can now expand its reach to those who do not have computers or smartphones."

The signs will display four lines of text with arrival information specific to the location of the bus shelter. The LED signs will be placed throughout the city to serve as many riders as possible.

Luminator Holding LP was awarded the competitively bid contract to manufacture the signs. The contract length is for one year for just over $1 million for the initial purchase. A separate contract to install, maintain and remove the LED signs was awarded to JC Decaux in the amount of $687,300.

The funds were made available through a Regional Transit Authority grant and a Federal Transit Administration, Congestion Mitigation and Quality (CMAQ) grant. CTA has the option to purchase up to 2,050 LED signs for up to five years from the date of the contract.

 

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