September 21, 2011

New rule strengthens accessibility at rail stations

The U.S. Department of Transportation (DOT) is amending its Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) regulations to require intercity, commuter and high-speed passenger railroads to ensure, at new and significantly renovated station platforms, that passengers with disabilities can get on and off any accessible car of the train.

Passenger railroads must provide level-entry boarding at new or altered stations in which no track passing through the station and adjacent to platforms is shared with existing freight rail operations.

For new or altered stations in which track shared with existing freight rail operations precludes compliance, passenger railroads will be able to choose among a variety of means to meet a performance standard to ensure that passengers with disabilities can access each accessible train car that other passengers can board at the station.

These options include providing car-borne lifts, station-based lifts, or mini-high platforms.

The U.S. DOT will review a railroad's proposed method to ensure that it provides reliable and safe services to individuals with disabilities in an integrated manner.

The rule also requires that transit providers carry a wheelchair and occupant if the lift and vehicle can physically accommodate them, unless doing so is inconsistent with legitimate safety requirements.

In addition, it codifies the existing U.S. DOT mechanism for issuing ADA guidance and makes minor technical changes to the department's ADA rules.

To read the Final Rule, click here.

 

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