May 23, 2012

LIRR announces $211M in capital improvements

The Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) customers will benefit from a series of capital improvements worth $211.5 million over the next five years. Some 40% of the LIRR's daily ridership passes along this critical stretch of track called the Main Line, a place where trains from five branches of the LIRR converge every day.

One-half of the investment — $106 million — will go toward a major rehabilitation of Hicksville Station coupled with adjacent track and signal modernization that in its entirety represents a major commitment to one of the LIRR busiest stations and an historic hamlet where local business and civic leaders are trying to revitalize the downtown.

"The importance of the MTA Capital Plan to both the short and long term economic growth of Long Island is fully demonstrated by the impact of these construction projects,” said MTA Chairman Joseph Lhota. “In the short term, construction means jobs, something that the MTA has provided continually over many years. Long term, these projects link to East Side Access, America's biggest public works project and one that promises to shave commuting time and make Long Island more attractive for living and doing business."

Other projects include replacing the Ellison Avenue Bridge in Westbury and improvements at Mineola Station to correct a persistent flooding problem and improve pedestrian flow.

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