August 16, 2012

MCI completes GO Transit order

Motor Coach Industries (MCI) delivered 18 Commuter Coach models to GO Transit, the Province of Ontario’s public transit system serving the Greater Toronto and Hamilton area. The delivery completes a 36-coach order for 2012.  

GO Transit’s latest models are powered by the newest Cummins clean-diesel engines and Allison transmission for near-zero emissions. The new coaches feature 57 comfortable forward-facing seats by Amaya, a Braun wheelchair lift, overhead airflow controls, LED interior lighting including reading lights, and other comforts designed to attract suburban and other distance commuters.

The MCI Commuter Coach’s standard features include the latest-generation ACTIA multiplex system with an ergonomic driver dash, as well as Electronic Stability Control, a tire pressure monitoring system and the Amerex fire suppression system. GO Transit added an optional Axion destination sign and an Alpha-Tron Altra capacitor that aids in cold-weather starts.

The MCI Commuter Coach, which is based on the popular D4500, is known for its overall build quality and low cost of operation.  

GO Transit’s fleet of 436 vehicles, 414 are made by MCI, and carry about 37,000 bus riders a day. A division of Metrolinx, GO Transit, Canada’s first provincially created and funded transit agency, serves a population of six million and carries more than 217,000 riders a day on trains and buses combined, with 62 million riders annually.



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