April 2, 2013

TTC creates 'personal car' for April Fool's Day

In the spirit of April Fool's Day, April 1, the Toronto Transit Commission announced a new customer service initiative called the “personal car,” which they promoted in a lighthearted video addressing customer etiquette on the subway.

According to a TTC release, customers frequently report irksome behaviors of their fellow riders on the subway, such as wearing bulky backpacks, putting feet on seats, bags on seats, eating meals, playing loud music and personal grooming.

The TTC created this special explainer video about the “personal car,” which shows TTC Executive Director, Corporate Communications Brad Ross (left) and Chief Customer Officer Chris Upfold acting out "offensive behaviors" such as talking loudly on cellphones and eating food, to help illustrate the faux initiative.

The TTC could have created an ad campaign to lecture and cajole those whose behaviours, while riding the TTC, are less than considerate. Instead, it produced this video on April Fool’s Day to help drive home some important points (in a light-hearted manner) about the need for greater consideration of others while taking public transit, according to the TTC.

While the “personal car” was not real, not even until noon on April 1, the TTC does, in all sincerity, encouraged its customers to consider others that day and every day while riding the TTC, the release said.

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