February 4, 2014

'Mass transportation Super Bowl' not without its glitches

SECAUCUS, N.J. — With wait times inching up to three hours for service, several people traveling to Sunday’s Super Bowl at MetLife Stadium collapsed while waiting at the Secaucus train station, which was serving as the central hub for people using mass transportation to get to the game, according to SI.Com.

NJ Transit reported nearly 30,000 fans rode public transportation to the game, which was a new record. Following the game, fans using mass transportation were asked to wait inside the stadium to prevent another logjam. For the full story, click here.

To fill the gap in service, NJ Transit brought in 20 charter buses, which transported 1,112 customers out of the lines for the trains at MetLife Stadium and dropped them off at the Port Authority Bus Terminal in Manhattan, according to The Star-Ledger.

"Motorcoach companies working together saved the day for thousands of Super Bowl fans," said American Bus Association President/CEO Peter J. Pantuso. "This was a team effort by all of the companies working on this massive project. It once again shows that motorcoaches are a safe, reliable, flexible form of transportation, no matter what type of event or venue. Motorcoaches safely provide some 700 million passenger trips each year, just about the same number as the airline industry, and on Super Bowl Sunday, the industry once again showed its professionalism and true value."

For the full story, click here.

deli.cio.us digg it stumble upon newsvine
[ Request More Info about this product / service / company ]


E-NEWSLETTER

Receive the latest Metro E-Newsletters in your inbox!

Join the Metro E-Newsletters and receive the latest news in your e-mail inbox once a week. SIGN UP NOW!

View the latest eNews
Express Tuesday | Express Thursday | University Transit

White Papers

Mass Transit Capital Planning An overview of the world-class best practices for assessing, prioritizing, and funding capital projects to optimize resources and align with the organization’s most critical immediate and long-term goals.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Service in ADA Complementary Paratransit Many U.S. transit agencies continue to struggle with the quality of ADA service, the costs, and the difficulties encountered in contracting the service, which is the method of choice for a significant majority of agencies. One of the most basic policy decisions an agency must make involves whether to provide door-to-door, or only curb-to-curb service.

Mass transit mobile Wi-Fi & the public sector case study How Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority successfully implemented Wi-Fi on its light rail and bus lines

More white papers


 
DIGITAL EDITION

The full contents of Metro Magazine on your computer! The digital edition is an exact replica of the print magazine with enhanced search, multimedia and hyperlink features. View the current issue