March 19, 2014

L.A. subway extension dig unearths prehistoric relics

LOS ANGELES — The Los Angeles Times reported an exploratory shaft that was dug by Los Angeles County Metropolitan Transportation Authority (Metro) to assess soil conditions for future tunnels and stations for the Westside Subway extension has unearthed a substantial amount of prehistoric relics. The dig is located near the LaBrea Tar Pits.

Relics include mollusks, sand dollars, pieces of driftwood and Monterey cypress cones. Paleontologist Kim Scott told the paper that the most exciting finds have been a rock embedded with what appears to be part of a sea lion's mouth that may be two million years old and a non-fossilized 10-foot limb from a digger pine tree.

Scott added that the Miracle Mile, the area the dig was held in, “is where the best record of life from the last great ice age in the world is found.”

Metro is working with Cogstone and Page Museum researchers to identify and preserve the representative sampling, according to the Times. For the full story, click here.

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