April 14, 2014

Denver cracks down on strollers, carts in wheelchair areas of buses

DENVER — FOX 31 reported that the Denver Regional Transportation District (RTD) began more strict enforcement of a policy that requires large items such as strollers and grocery carts to be collapsed before boarding. Those items must remain out of the aisle and with the riders, behind the front area reserved for people with wheelchairs.

The policy, initially enacted in 2003, has raised concerned from some mothers who have to juggle children while collapsing strollers and those with large items. However, RTD’s drivers are required to help a rider collapse a stroller if they request assistance.

An RTD official told the news outlet that riders with disabilities filed a lawsuit because for years, the able-bodied took the seats in the designated area and wouldn’t give them up when a person with a disability boarded the bus.

The agency relaxed the rules to help mothers and those with large items sit up front, but that was only on the condition that they moved if a person in a wheelchair got on the bus. For the full story, click here.

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