June 12, 2014

Edmonton rolls out BYD test bus

The Edmonton Transit System (ETS) began testing two BYD electric buses — known as ETS Stealth buses — this week.

Operated entirely on electricity, the buses run quietly and cleanly and are more cost-effective to fuel and maintain than diesel engine buses currently used. The ETS Stealth buses also have no exhaust pipes and generate zero emissions when being driven.

The buses will run on various ETS routes across the city, travelling with regularly scheduled buses in service and for special events. Passengers can board free of charge. Instead of paying a fare, passengers will be asked to complete a survey describing their experience riding an electric bus.

“Public feedback is essential to determining the success of the ETS Stealth pilot project,” said ETS Bus Operations Divisional Supervisor Linda Kadatz. “We hope to hear from every ETS Stealth passenger so that we can make an informed decision later this year about pursuing electric bus technology in our long-term fleet replacement plans.”

The ETS Stealth buses are on lease from BYD until October 2014. During the four-month pilot ETS will evaluate the suitability of the ETS Stealth bus based on several factors, including passenger load capacity, passenger comfort, reliability and how well the buses navigate Edmonton’s roadway network.

 

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