Rail

Siemens to build locomotives for Amtrak

Posted on October 29, 2010

[IMAGE]Siemens-Amtrak-loco-full-2.jpg[/IMAGE] Siemens announced that it has been awarded a $466 million contract to build 70 electric locomotives for Amtrak's Northeast and Keystone Corridor lines as part of Amtrak's landmark fleet rejuvenation initiative. The contract will require an additional 250 people to build the locomotives, with 200 in Sacramento, Calif., and 50 collectively in Norwood, Ohio and Alpharetta, Ga.

The locomotives will be built at Siemens' existing light rail manufacturing facility in Sacramento, Calif. The plant, which has been in operation for 26 years, is powered up to 80 percent by two megawatts of solar energy and employs 750 people. All main components of the new locomotive will be produced in Siemens plants in the U.S. — including the motors in Alpharetta and propulsion containers in Norcross, Ga.

The first locomotives will be delivered in 2013.

"As the global leader in rail innovation, we are thrilled that Amtrak has selected our proven locomotive technology and that this project will create 250 new green manufacturing jobs in the United States," said Daryl Dulaney, president and CEO, Siemens Industry, Inc. "These locomotives will be built in America using renewable energy and provide cleaner, more efficient movement of people on the most heavily traveled rail route in the country."

"Amtrak is a critical transportation provider in the Northeast and modern locomotives are essential to meet the service reliability expectations of our passengers and for us to handle the growing ridership demand in the coming years," said President/CEO Joseph Boardman.

Siemens is already a successful producer of American light rail trains with every third light rail vehicle in the United States being a Siemens train. The new Amtrak Cities Sprinter (ACS64) is based on Siemens latest iteration of the proven EuroSprinter electric locomotive. Over 1,600 units are in operation worldwide, and this latest version will be customized to meet the strenuous environment of the Northeast Corridor at a sustained speed of 125 mph.

The current locomotive platform has been designed for improved safety, reliability and maintainability. The Amtrak-specific design also meets the latest Federal Railroad Administration requirements for front end strength, incorporating a crumple zone for collision with large objects in addition to an enhanced safety cage and anti-climber functionality.

This equipment purchase is part of Amtrak's multi-year Fleet Strategy Plan to replace its entire fleet of passenger rail cars and locomotives over the next 30 years.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Hyperloop to build full-scale track next year

The Quay Valley, Calif. Hyperloop track will be built using HTT’s tube, capsule and station models. It will be instrumental in optimizing passenger system needs — such as loading, departure and safety considerations — to ensure Hyperloop is ready for larger-scale operation.

Keolis/MBTA make strides with commuter rail snowstorm recovery

Milestones include the completion of snow and ice removal from all platforms and critical rail switches system-wide, as well as the addition of supplemental trains, doubledecker and standard passenger cars to increase capacity and combat overcrowding.

Alstom to deliver to Sydney Citadis X05

Company is responsible for the integrated tramway system, which includes the design, delivery and commissioning of 30 coupled Citadis X05 trams; power supply equipment, including APS -ground power supply; signaling systems, the energy recovery system HESOP, depot equipment and maintenance.

Ann Arbor transit official urged MDOT not to lease railcars

In 2009, more than a year before MDOT signed a contract to lease and refurbish the double-decker railcars, which since have cost the state about $12 million, an Ann Arbor transit official told MDOT the cars were not suitable for proposed commuter rail services because they didn't meet federal requirements.

Hitachi purchases manufacturer of Honolulu's rail system

Finmeccanica owns all of AnsaldoBreda, which is unprofitable, and 40% of Ansaldo STS, which is profitable, according to the report. The two Ansaldo companies formed a joint venture, Ansaldo Honolulu JV, to design and build the 20-mile, 21-station elevated train system for Oahu under a $1.4 billion contract.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

Please sign in or register to .    Close