FRA to redirect $1 billion in high-speed rail funds

Posted on December 9, 2010

The Federal Railroad Administration (FRA) will redirect $1.195 billion in high-speed rail funds originally designated for Wisconsin and Ohio to other states eager to develop high-speed rail corridors across the U.S.

Wisconsin suspended work under its existing high-speed rail agreement, and the incoming Governors in Wisconsin and Ohio have both indicated that they will not move forward to use high-speed rail money received under the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA). As a result, $1.195 billion will be redirected to high-speed rail projects already underway in other states.

“High-speed rail will modernize America’s valuable transportation network, while reinvigorating the manufacturing sector and putting people back to work in good-paying jobs,” said Transportation Secretary Ray LaHood. “I am pleased that so many other states are enthusiastic about the additional support they are receiving to help bring America’s high-speed rail network to life.”

The Recovery Act included $8 billion to launch a national high-speed rail program that will modernize America’s transportation network, spur economic development domestically and keep the U.S. competitive with other leading nations. High-speed rail grants announced under the Recovery Act can be used only for high-speed rail projects and not for other transportation projects.

Last year, the Obama Administration received a commitment from 30 domestic and foreign rail manufacturers to establish or expand their base of operations in the U.S., if selected for contracts building America’s high-speed rail network. These rail manufacturers and suppliers committed to not only locate in the U.S., but to ensure high-speed rail projects are built by American workers with American-made supplies.

To deliver maximum economic benefits to American taxpayers, the Administration’s high-speed rail program also includes a 100 percent ‘Buy American’ requirement.

Under the Recovery Act, the FRA originally announced $810 million for Wisconsin’s Milwaukee-Madison corridor and $400 million for Ohio’s Cincinnati-Columbus-Cleveland “3C” route. The FRA will redirect $810 million from Wisconsin and $385 million from Ohio, and will work with these states to determine whether they have already spent money under their contracts that should be reimbursed.

The $1.195 billion originally designated for those high-speed rail projects in Wisconsin and Ohio will now be used to support projects in the following states:

  • Washington State: up to $161.5 million.
  • Illinois: up to $42.3 million.
  • New York: up to $7.3 million.
  • Maine: up to $3.3 million.
  • Massachusetts: up to $2.8 million.
  • Vermont: up to $2.7 million.
  • Missouri up to $2.2 million.
  • Wisconsin: up to $2 million for the Hiawatha line.
  • Oregon: up to $1.6 million.
  • North Carolina: up to $1.5 million.
  • Iowa: up to $309,080.
  • Indiana: up to $364,980.

 EXTRA: Click here to find out how much Japan is offering to help pay for Florida's high-speed rail project.


View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Amtrak bans Samsung Galaxy Note 7

Faulty batteries on the phones that can overheat are blamed for fires around the world, prompting Samsung to issue recalls and stop production on the Note 7. The FAA has already banned the phones from all airlines.

DART adds 3 miles to Blue Line light rail system

Connecting an area known as the Education Corridor to downtown by light rail enables more people to discover the academic programs offered at the UNT Dallas, Paul Quinn College and Cedar Valley College.

LA Metro unveils new tunnel boring machine named Angeli

At the event Board Chair Fasana awarded TAP Cards to students who won contests to name the TBM and create an illustration for its tail shield.

Bombardier confirms progress on turnaround plan

The actions support the company’s efforts to build its earnings growth potential and highlight its focus on improving productivity, reducing costs, and optimizing its worldwide footprint to deliver increased value to customers and shareholders.

BYD enters mass transit market with low-cost train

The light rail technology is applicable to small and medium-sized cities, heavy traffic routes, CBD’s and routes connecting tourist attractions in large cities, according to the company.

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment



Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close