Rail

TTC launches free Wi-Fi at 2 subway stations

Posted on December 11, 2013

BAI Canada and the Toronto Transit Commission (TTC) launched free advertising-supported Wi-Fi at Bloor-Yonge and St. George stations.

The Wi-Fi service, called TCONNECT, provides subway riders at these interchange stations with the ability to access social media, e-mail, and browse the Internet on the platform and other public areas of the stations. These two initial stations are Toronto’s busiest, accommodating approximately 25% of the TTC’s subway riders each weekday.

This announcement marks the first of many milestones in a larger wireless installation project that will help commuters stay connected throughout the TTC subway system. BAI Canada is building a shared wireless Wi-Fi and cellular infrastructure that allows wireless communications services for transit riders within underground subway stations. When complete, each station will host the TCONNECT Wi-Fi service and be cellular-capable.

BAI Canada has partnered with the Performance Content Group, which has launched a new mobile and content marketing initiative with Starcom MediaVest Group and AOL Canada and its popular news site, The Huffington Post Canada. Riders will have access to on-the-go news stories from HuffPost Canada and messaging from Mondelēz Canada, a snack company in Canada and makers of Stride and Dentyne gum, Oreo cookies and Cadbury chocolate.
 
The official launch follows a two-week soft launch that began on November 25, when customers at these stations had the opportunity to test the TCONNECT Wi-Fi network firsthand.

BAI Canada and the TTC are delivering Wi-Fi and cellular infrastructure to all subway stations, covering all public areas including platforms, mezzanines, walkways, and stairwells within the 65 current and planned underground stations.

BAI Canada is paying the TTC $25 million over 20 years for the rights to install and operate the network. The second phase of the project is the extension of the cellular network within the TTC tunnels. All work is expected to be complete in three to four years.  

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