The Oakley Transit Center will offer more convenient connections between five major Metro routes in addition to providing improved access to employment opportunities, medical services, shopping and entertainment in the area,” said Metro CEO/GM Dwight A. Ferrell (far left). Photo: SORTA

The Oakley Transit Center will offer more convenient connections between five major Metro routes in addition to providing improved access to employment opportunities, medical services, shopping and entertainment in the area,” said Metro CEO/GM Dwight A. Ferrell (far left). Photo: SORTA

The Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority (Metro) broke ground on what will soon become the new Oakley Transit Center.

The transit center will provide improved connections and amenities to make using public transit more convenient. The hub will include four boarding bays, designated off-street park & ride spaces for commuters, enhanced transit shelters, streetscaping, wayfinding, a ticket vending machine and real-time information screens.

The Oakley area represents approximately 7,100 jobs and is home to several major retailers including the world’s second largest Kroger, making it the ideal transit center location, according to SORTA officials.

“The Oakley Transit Center will offer more convenient connections between five major Metro routes in addition to providing improved access to employment opportunities, medical services, shopping and entertainment in the area,”  said Metro CEO/GM Dwight A. Ferrell.

The Oakley Transit Center will be served by two crosstown routes, the 41 and 51, connecting the east and west sides of town; two local routes, the 4 and 11; and one express route, the 12X, with service into downtown Cincinnati.

The $1.2 million Oakley Transit Center project is funded through a Federal Surface Transportation Program grant and local match funds. Image: SORTA

The $1.2 million Oakley Transit Center project is funded through a Federal Surface Transportation Program grant and local match funds. Image: SORTA

The project, which is expected to be completed this winter, was designed by the Transportation Planning and Urban Design section of the City of Cincinnati’s Department of Transportation and Engineering.

The $1.2 million Oakley Transit Center project is funded through a Federal Surface Transportation Program grant and local match funds. Project partners include the Ohio Department of Transportation, OKI Regional Council of Governments, and the City of Cincinnati.

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