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Recognizing a Job Well Done at Your Bus Operation

Recognizing a Job Well Done at Your Bus Operation

In most organizations, 80% to 95% of all bus operators are found to be safe, reliable and courteous, but often, they don’t know it because nobody tells them. If safe bus operation represents a core value for your property, what are you leaders doing to encourage and reinforce the desired behaviors among your bus operators?

June 8, 2015

'Practical Drift' is Bus Safety's Silent Adversary
The Challenge of Reporting Near-Miss Bus Operation Incidents

The Challenge of Reporting Near-Miss Bus Operation Incidents

Nobody questions the value of reviewing vehicle “near-miss” incidents; however, there are plenty of skeptics out there harboring doubts that bus operators will actually report themselves committing unsafe acts. Often, when the subject of self-reporting is being discussed, it is greeted by swells of suppressed laughter by those familiar with human nature.

March 15, 2017

How Using One-Third Rule Helps Bus Operators Manage Intersections
Focus on Coaching to Raise Driver Training Effectiveness

Focus on Coaching to Raise Driver Training Effectiveness

Dr. Donald Kirkpatrick long ago defined four levels of evaluation to determine the effectiveness of any training program. It is common for the bulk of effort being put forth by any training department to focus on Level 1 and Level 2. This typically manifests as the time we spend planning for and executing the prescribed training activities that form our learning programs. Many organizations are now finding that they have the most potential for achieving performance improvements by focusing more energy and resources toward Level 3 activities, such as coaching.

March 9, 2016

How Effective Scanning Helps Bus Operators See Potential Driving Hazards

How Effective Scanning Helps Bus Operators See Potential Driving Hazards

The world is a very busy place. We rely on our eyes to provide us with information that will keep us from harm as we operate our vehicles. It is difficult to over-emphasize the importance of effective scanning in order to recognize potential hazards early enough so appropriate action can be taken to avoid conflict. As a result, we spend a lot of time advising operators how often they should scan their mirrors, where to look for hazards, and how to bring objects into view that may be temporarily obstructed, and so on.

November 11, 2015

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