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public transit campaign

Where are the Super Bowl-esque ads about public transportation?

When it comes to communicating that people have transportation options besides their own drive-alone cars, the transit industry is getting its lunch handed to it, and has been for decades. It must face that it’s a fringe player that wants to become mainstream. And it’s not getting any easier. While we hear so many great stories about options presented by bikeshare systems and technology and Uber, the fact remains that people are buying cars more than ever.

Public Transit Helps Support National Dump the Pump Day

Sponsored by APTA, in partnership with the Natural Resources Defense Council, this national public awareness day encourages people to change their travel behavior and switch from driving a car to riding a bus or train.

MBTA debuts hip-hop inspired safety video

The video, which features MBTA staff and riders singing and dancing along to a hip-hop inspired song, "The Safety Bounce," was financed by Titan, the advertising firm that contracts with the transit agency.

MBTA unveils ‘Courtesy Critters’ for campaign

The “Courtesy Counts” campaign uses signs with images of various animals and a light, humorous tone to impart messages about transit etiquette. A group of pigs reminds riders not to hog a seat, especially from an elderly or disabled person, and a cast of crabs reminds them to be nice to operators.

CUTA launches online transit campaign

"Take Action! Write to the Minister" rallies members and the public to voice their support and call on Canada’s federal government to increase funding for public transit. Includes an action center designed to send a letter to Minister Lebel with recommendations to make public transit an integral part of the next long term infrastructure plan, and a social media campaign.

Fla. city mulls sidewalk chalk transit campaign

While other cities have joined Broward County Transit's campaign to promote public transportation with pro-public transit slogans stenciled on its sidewalks, the city of Hollywood rejected it, due to concerns over inviting graffiti.