Testing whether Night Owl rail services can 'fly'

Posted on June 18, 2014 by Heather Redfern - Also by this author

SEPTA Deputy General Manager Jeff Knueppel talks about the new overnight weekend subway service at a rally for customers.
SEPTA Deputy General Manager Jeff Knueppel talks about the new overnight weekend subway service at a rally for customers.
Those who depend on mass transit believe that service should be available 24 hours a day, seven days a week so that they can get to where they need to go, whenever they need to get there. In New York, MTA customers can hop on the subway 24 hours a day. In Chicago, CTA riders can use the Blue and Red “L” lines around the clock. But in cities like Boston and Philadelphia, major service lines and routes are not always all that convenient in the early hours of the morning — until now.

Two pilot programs recently launched by MBTA in Boston and SEPTA in Philadelphia are exploring the demand for late night service on the agencies’ most popular lines.

In late March, MBTA extended service on its Red, Orange, Green, Blue, Mattapan and Silver Lines, and 14 bus routes by 90 minutes on Fridays and Saturdays. In just the first month of the year-long pilot, MBTA had more than 72,000 late-night subway trips.     

In Philadelphia, SEPTA offers 24/7 service on 22 bus routes. But since 1991, the authority has substituted overnight rail service on its Broad Street (subway) and Market-Frankford (subway-elevated) lines — its highest ridership modes —with Nite Owl buses. On Sunday, June 15, SEPTA started a summer-long pilot of 24-hour weekend train service on the Broad Street and Marker-Frankford Lines.

RELATED: U. of Mich. pilots late-night, off-campus route

Low ridership was cited as a main reason why SEPTA switched from train to bus service. However, in the 23 years since overnight train service was halted on the subway lines, Philadelphia’s nightlife has become more vibrant, with new restaurants, sports arenas and other attractions opening across the city. With more people out and about later in the evening, a demand for more reliable late night transportation alternatives was created.

“There has been a late-night renaissance in Philadelphia,” said SEPTA GM Joseph M. Casey. “More people are moving back to the city. And, more people are coming into Center City to enjoy the restaurants, and to experience nightlife venues. To get to these spots, Philadelphia officials, community and business leaders and young people asked SEPTA to run trains after midnight. We heard them and decided to introduce the summer weekend pilot.”  

SEPTA will evaluate the weekend late night train program after the summer, examining ridership, staffing costs, safety and other factors to determine if the service should continue.  

The extended service initiatives in Philadelphia and Boston are examples of how agencies keep the “public” in public transportation by listening to customers and the community and working on compromises that can benefit all parties.

In case you missed it...

Read our previous blog, "Keeping your drivers on the bus from ‘hire to retire’"

View comments or post a comment on this story. (1 Comment)

More Transit Dispatches Blog Posts

July 19, 2017

Reimagining the Public Transportation Rider Experience for the Digital Age

Transit systems move millions of people each day, getting us to where we need to go, influencing our moods, and shaping our collective stories. But, faced with fluctuating ridership, uncertain budgets, and the sky-high expectations of a digital savvy customer — open app, get car — how can centuries-old transit systems keep up?

July 12, 2017

The Case for Outcome-Based Procurement in Transit

Would you buy cash-handling services and dictate to the security firm what type of armored truck and cash counters to use? By the same logic, why would you buy an innovative transit product or platform and mandate how the vendor designs the technology? You likely would not — and why would you?

June 14, 2017

Why Investing in 'Half Measures' When Hiring Frontline Employees Will Bring Public Transit to Its Knees

The public transit industry faces a severe human resources crisis... we began to focus on the science behind identifying and hiring more resilient human beings up front, in order to make it easier to build resilience and preparedness with employees once they are onboard.

June 7, 2017

Making it Easier to Do Business with the Transit Industry

Doing business with a large transportation organization is not as daunting as one might think.The Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority uses technology and in-person networking to facilitate relationships with companies pursuing opportunities with the authority.

May 30, 2017

The Evolution of Streetcar Technology

While streetcars may seem like an old fashioned or nostalgic mode of transportation, today’s streetcar is far from your grandmother’s trolley. The modern streetcar has evolved in major ways in response to shifts in community needs as well as technological advances.

See More

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (1)

More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The number 1 resource for vocational truck fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close