Management & Operations

Melaniphy resigns as head of APTA

Posted on April 29, 2016

APTA
APTA

The American Public Transportation Association (APTA) announced today that Michael P. Melaniphy has resigned as APTA's President & CEO, effective April 29. The action comes after consensus between the APTA Executive Committee and Melaniphy.

To assure a smooth transition, the Board of Directors has appointed APTA VP – Member Services Richard A. White as acting president/CEO of APTA. White previously served as APTA’s chair (2004-2005) and has a distinguished career in public transportation. He has held top management roles at NJ TRANSIT, the Bay Area Rapid Transit in San Francisco and later at the Washington Metropolitan Area Transit Authority in Washington, D.C. White will lead the organization until a permanent president/CEO is selected.

APTA Chair Valarie J. McCall said Melaniphy’s resignation and the appointment of an acting president/CEO mark a new chapter of dynamic leadership for APTA, the premier association for the public transportation industry in North America.    

“APTA is sharply focused on continuing its legacy as a leader that represents all modes of public transportation while advancing the future of public transportation in North America,” said McCall. “We thank Michael for his valuable service, and for being a strong advocate and champion for public transit. APTA will conduct a national search and ensure that this process will be transparent as we work to appoint the next president/CEO.” 

“It has been an honor to lead this association with such a rich history rooted in its founding in 1882,” said Melaniphy. “Working with an outstanding Board of Directors, wonderful membership, an amazing and dedicated staff of passionate experts, and the myriad of coalition partners as well as the U.S. Congress and Administration has been a real pleasure.” 

Melaniphy continued, “Together we have demonstrated that we can enhance the quality of life for all Americans, provide equal transportation access for all, and enhance the global competitiveness of this great nation. Thank you to my colleagues, friends and family for this amazing opportunity and I wish APTA and the American Public Transportation Foundation (APTF) many great years ahead.”

McCall said the change in leadership will spark and encourage all APTA stakeholders, from APTA members to coalition partners, to step forward with their thoughts and suggestions for improving the association at all levels. She said APTA is welcoming constructive input to make the association as transparent and open as possible.

McCall added, “APTA and its members remain committed in their efforts to improve public transportation  which enhances the quality of life in America and makes our nation more competitive in the global marketplace. We thank the hard-working and dedicated APTA staff as we look forward to continued collaboration and unity while we work toward building an even brighter and more mobile future for every citizen.” 

 

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