April 11, 2013

N.J. receives $76M in Sandy relief funds

To continue to repair damage caused by Hurricane Sandy, $76 million in emergency relief funds has been made available to New Jersey.

The funds, which come from the Disaster Relief Appropriations Act of 2013 passed by Congress and signed by President Obama, bring the total funding from the Federal Highway Administration’s (FHWA) emergency relief program to $224 million for New Jersey’s Hurricane Sandy-related repairs.

“These funds represent our ongoing commitment to help New Jersey and her neighbors rebuild and recover from Hurricane Sandy,” said Secretary of Transportation Ray LaHood. “The work is far from over but, as President Obama has directed, we will continue to help these states recover by rebuilding the transportation infrastructure they need to get to work, school and everywhere else they need to go.”

Funds from the FHWA will be used to reimburse the state for expenses associated with damage from Hurricane Sandy, including reconstructing or replacing damaged highways and bridges, creating temporary detours, and replacing safety devices such as guardrails and overhead lighting.

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