August 8, 2013

Chicago's 2200-series railcars make last run

Most distinctive for their pivoting “blinker” entry doors, the 2200s spent most of their service careers assigned to the Blue Line and have served hundreds of millions of people. By David Wilson

Most distinctive for their pivoting “blinker” entry doors, the 2200s spent most of their service careers assigned to the Blue Line and have served hundreds of millions of people. By David Wilson
Following more than 40 years of service to Chicago Transit Authority (CTA) customers, the CTA will celebrate the workhorses of the Blue Line — the 2200-series railcars built in 1969-1970 — with a ceremonial last trip on Thursday.

Most distinctive for their pivoting “blinker” entry doors, the 2200s spent most of their service careers assigned to the Blue Line and have served hundreds of millions of people traveling between work, home, O’Hare International Airport and spots in between.

The CTA’s oldest cars are being retired as CTA continues to upgrade its rail fleet as part of an aggressive modernization and infrastructure plan by Mayor Rahm Emanuel and CTA President Forrest Claypool.

Customers and rail fans are welcome to join in on the CTA tradition of saying “Goodbye, Old Friends” as the last, eight-car consist of 2200-series rail cars makes its final trip along the Blue Line from O’Hare to Forest Park and back. Normal CTA fares apply.

All eight rail cars will be decked out with their original exterior decals and will even feature interior advertising cards from the period when they first launched.

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