Accessibility

Long Island Rail Road strike averted, deal reached

Posted on July 17, 2014

New York Governor Andrew M. Cuomo says a deal has been reached between the MTA and the Long Island Rail Road unions, averting a strike that could have come this weekend.

The Governor, Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) Chairman and CEO Thomas F. Prendergast, and United Transportation Union President Anthony Simon, representing a coalition of eight Long Island Rail Road (LIRR) labor unions, today announced an agreement to settle a four-year-old contract dispute between the MTA and the unions.

RELATED: Long Island Rail negotiations collapse, workers prepare to strike

The agreement provides the 17% wage increase recommended by the Presidential Emergency Board, and includes the first-ever healthcare contributions from the 5,400 workers that make up the eight unions while protecting commuters and the MTA’s long-term financial stability.

“The Long Island Rail Road is a critical artery in connecting the downstate region, and the men and women who keep it running play a vital role in the lives of our commuters and in the communities that the LIRR serves,” Governor Cuomo said. “Resolving this contract dispute is the right thing to do, and the agreement we have reached today is fair to all parties. It recognizes the many contributions of the LIRR’s hardworking employees, while also maintaining the fiscal integrity of the MTA. I thank everyone involved in these negotiations, especially UTU Chairman Anthony Simon and MTA Chairman Tom Prendergast, whose collective dedication to the needs of LIRR commuters made this agreement possible.”

“The agreement we reached today with the assistance of Governor Cuomo is just what he advocated – a fair and reasonable contract that will enable the nation’s busiest commuter railroad to continue to serve the people of Long Island,” MTA Chairman Prendergast said. “Both sides have compromised to reach an agreement that gives our employees the raises they deserve while also providing for the MTA’s long-term financial stability. I want to express my thanks to all the LIRR employees who continued to provide safe and reliable service through these discussions, and to our customers who can now be assured of uninterrupted service.”

“Today’s agreement provides a fair and equitable contract for our existing and future employees and we couldn’t have gotten it done without the Governor’s help,” United Transportation Union President Simon said. “Our workers move hundreds of thousands of commuters a day and their services are integral to the New York economy. On behalf of 5,400 hardworking union members involved in these negotiations, I thank the Governor for his efforts, and the MTA for coming to a compromise.”

Under the terms of the agreement, based on the recommendations of the Presidential Emergency Board, existing LIRR employees will receive 17 percent raises over a term of 6-1/2 years. To ensure the long-term affordability of these wage increases, all employees will for the first time contribute to their health insurance costs, and new employees will have different wage progressions and pension plan contributions.

The contract will have no impact on MTA fares and will be accommodated within revisions to the MTA financial plan.

The tentative agreement is subject to approval by the eight Long Island Rail Road unions’ executive boards and ratification by their membership, and subsequent approval by the MTA Board.

View comments or post a comment on this story. (0 Comments)

More News

Robotics project aims to aid visually impaired navigate cities

Carnegie Mellon University’s Robotics Institute is aiming to incorporate robots, smartphones, mobile applications and crowd-sourced information into a system that can help blind people navigate complicated and unfamiliar urban environments, such as transit stations.

Honolulu's Handi Van chief replaced amid service issues

Last fall, complaints about busy reservation lines and late van pick-ups spiked when a new reservation system began operation.

For disabled students, UW campus accessibility falls short

Karen Brown, a disabled 63-year-old returning student who suffers from lupus, said she must suffer through all types of weather to get to campus via public transportation because she cannot afford the high price of accessible parking spaces on campus.

Paratransit best practices often not implemented, fed report says

There have been great gains in best practices in the areas of eligibility, telephone hold time, on-time performance, no-show policies, and origin-to-destination service, but they are often not implemented, according to the newly released National Council on Disability report.

 

Mobility Ventures donates wheelchair-accessible MV-1 to Fort Worth charity

The event, held in conjunction with APTA's 2015 Bus & Paratransit Conference, recognized Catholic Charities Fort Worth for its dedication to providing service to those in need, according to the company. 

See More News

Post a Comment

Post Comment

Comments (0)



More From The World's Largest Fleet Publisher

Automotive Fleet

The Car and truck fleet and leasing management magazine

Business Fleet

managing 10-50 company vehicles

Fleet Financials

Executive vehicle management

Government Fleet

managing public sector vehicles & equipment

TruckingInfo.com

THE COMMERCIAL TRUCK INDUSTRY’S MOST IN-DEPTH INFORMATION SOURCE

Work Truck Magazine

The resource for managers of class 1-7 truck Fleets

Schoolbus Fleet

Serving school transportation professionals in the U.S. and Canada

LCT Magazine

Global Resource For Limousine and Bus Transportation

Please sign in or register to .    Close