Transit Dispatches

Contributing bloggers discuss a variety of topics geared toward the transit and motorcoach sectors.

Back to the list

September 18, 2013

SEPTA offers a different type of school bus

by Heather Redfern - Also by this author

Students wait to take the Broad Street Line subway at City Hall Station — the line’s busiest station — during  the morning rush hour. Photo courtesy SEPTA.

Students wait to take the Broad Street Line subway at City Hall Station — the line’s busiest station — during  the morning rush hour. Photo courtesy SEPTA.

The bell ushering in the new academic year has rung and across the country children have headed back to school. For millions of students, getting to and from school means taking the bus. For those kids in major cities, that doesn’t mean the typical yellow bus, but a public transit bus, or even the subway.

In Philadelphia, Southeastern Pennsylvania Transportation Authority (SEPTA) transports approximately 58,000 of 134,000 public school students from a variety of grade levels every day, many using more than one mode of transit. Add to that 58,000 the thousands of parochial, private and charter school students commuting on public transit and you have close to 100,000 students using the SEPTA trains, buses and trolleys throughout the day, sometimes at the height of the morning and late afternoon rush hours.

For some adults who aren’t frequent transit riders, the thought of children traveling to and from school via a city bus or subway may seem daunting. But planning and collaboration between transit organizations, school districts and families can make the transition to using public transportation an easy one.

SEPTA recently launched its online School Trip Planner. Using the tool, students who are moving to new institutions as a result of school closures simply look up their previous schools to find routes that service their new institution.

“It gives three, four, five options, whether it’s the bus, trolley or the subway,” said Ron Hopkins, SEPTA assistant GM for operations. “We’ll tell you what station it is.”

Students and parents can click on the name of the new school to find route options from their homes. In a matter of seconds, the trip planner will provide the best travel routes. The agency’s regular online trip planner can also assist students who are attending other schools this year. SEPTA and the School District of Philadelphia encouraged parents and children to map out their routes before classes started and take “trial runs” to become familiar with stops, travel times and options.

And, to make using public transit an even more viable travel option for all students leaving their neighborhoods, since 2007, SEPTA has offered limited use Student Weekday Passes. The program was designed to provide free school-related transportation to Philadelphia middle and secondary school students, Mondays through Fridays from 5:30 a.m. to 7 p.m.

Prior to this, the school district required parents to purchase school tokens for their children. The district estimates the total quantity of passes needed for each school week and submits the order and payment to SEPTA. Passes are provided to the district in bulk and distributed to students by their schools. SEPTA calculates the number of passes actually used for travel for a specific week and credits the district for the unused passes.  

Offering extra travel assistance to students is not only good public service, it also helps public transit organizations cultivate the next generation of riders.

“For many of these kids, this is their first real exposure to our buses, trains and trolleys,” said Hopkins. “If we can teach them at a young age how convenient and reliable our service is, we may gain lifelong SEPTA customers.”

RELATED: "Chicago transit partnership to offer free student rides"

Heather Redfern

Public Information Manager, SEPTA


Write a letter to the editor
deli.cio.us digg it stumble upon newsvine


  • John Florio[ September 18th, 2013 @ 11:45am ]

    SEPTA should look into Japan Rail's PASMO card concept. Parents can receive a text as children pass through the transit system and arrive at their destination. http://www.japanretailnews.com/2/post/2008/12/japanese-train-ticket-raises-child-security.html

E-NEWSLETTER

Receive the latest Metro E-Newsletters in your inbox!

Join the Metro E-Newsletters and receive the latest news in your e-mail inbox once a week. SIGN UP NOW!

View the latest eNews
Express Tuesday | Express Thursday | University Transit

Author Bio

Heather Redfern

Public Information Manager, SEPTA


Marcia Ferranto

President/CEO, WTS International

Marcia Ferranto is President/CEO of WTS International.


Scott Belcher

President and CEO, Intelligent Transportation Society of America (ITS America)


Joe Zavisca

Joe Zavisca is an independent consultant specializing in paratransit service.


Paul Mackie

Communications Director, Mobility Lab

Paul Mackie is communications director at Mobility Lab, a leading U.S. voice of “transportation demand management.”


Rob Taylo

Founder/CEO SinglePoint Communications

Rob Taylo is founder/CEO of SinglePoint Communications, an exclusive U.S. distributor of WiFi in Motion.


Joel Volinski

Director, National Center for Transit Research at CUTR/USF


Brian Antolin

Consultant, Transportation and Travel Industry


Zack Shubkagel

Partner/Creative Director of Willoughby Design

Zack Shubkagel is partner and creative director for the San Francisco office of Willoughby Design, a strategic branding and design firm.


White Papers

Mass Transit Capital Planning An overview of the world-class best practices for assessing, prioritizing, and funding capital projects to optimize resources and align with the organization’s most critical immediate and long-term goals.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Service in ADA Complementary Paratransit Many U.S. transit agencies continue to struggle with the quality of ADA service, the costs, and the difficulties encountered in contracting the service, which is the method of choice for a significant majority of agencies. One of the most basic policy decisions an agency must make involves whether to provide door-to-door, or only curb-to-curb service.

Mass transit mobile Wi-Fi & the public sector case study How Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority successfully implemented Wi-Fi on its light rail and bus lines

More white papers


 
DIGITAL EDITION

The full contents of Metro Magazine on your computer! The digital edition is an exact replica of the print magazine with enhanced search, multimedia and hyperlink features. View the current issue