Government Issues

MTA: Alert system on wrong end of train

Posted on December 5, 2013

NEW YORK — Three days after the fatal Metro-North derailment, the Metropolitan Transportation Authority (MTA) said the train was equipped with technology to alert an inattentive engineer — but it was on the wrong end of the train, according to the Daily News.

The “alerter” system may have prevented disaster, however, due to protocol, the engineer was operating the train with remote controls from the lead car, which had no alerter.

The MTA’s acknowledgment of the existence of the alerter system on the train came as a New York Police Department officer who was on the train filed a $10 million suit, alleging the MTA was negligent. For the full story, click here.

Meanwhile, crews from Metro-North Railroad have completed the reconstruction of a second Hudson Line track in the area of Sunday’s derailment, allowing resumption of full service Thursday morning.

The work, including new ties, ballast, running rails, third rails and signal system, was completed in mid-afternoon and it was inspected by the Sperry Rail Car, which uses ultrasonic technology.

“I want to thank our customers for their patience during the railroad’s recovery from this most tragic accident,” said Metro-North President Howard Permut. “And, I want to thank the dedicated men and women of Metro-North who worked long and hard to achieve this reconstruction.”

A full AM peak service was set to be provided on the Hudson Line Thursday. The three trains that did not run on Wednesday morning will be restored to the schedule.

Reconstruction of Track 4, the most seriously damaged, will continue for the remainder of the week.

Ridership on the Hudson Line was about 25% below the normal AM peak on Wednesday, possibly as some customers diverted to the Harlem Line. The railroad expects customers to return on Thursday.

 

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