June 10, 2010

Ohio DOT tabs $15M for clean-fuel bus purchase

COLUMBUS, Ohio — Aimed at increasing the use of alternative fuels to connect Ohio’s cities and decreasing the operational costs facing Ohio’s transit agencies, the Ohio Department of Transportation (ODOT) is making an historic $15 million direct investment to purchase 41 environmentally friendly, clean-fuel buses for eleven local and regional transit authorities across the state.

“Never before has ODOT made this type of direct investment in our state’s transit agencies to bolster our commitment to promoting travel choice and cleaning the air we breathe,” said ODOT Director Jolene M. Molitoris. “In our larger cities, many of our transit partners are already making these environmentally friendlier investments. ODOT’s efforts will further leverage these investments — both in our urban and rural regions — to create a safer, greener, more multi-modal transportation system.”

ODOT’s $15 million Clean and Green Transit Program was part of the 2010-2011 State Transportation Budget approved by the Ohio Legislature and signed by Governor Strickland last Spring.

The agency received nearly $33 million in applications from local and regional transit authorities across the state. With the $15 million dollars in state funding appropriated under the Clean and Green Transit Program, 41 clean-fuel vehicles will be awarded to eleven local and regional transit authorities.

The largest investment will be made in the Toledo area. ODOT will partner with the Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority to purchase eight new 40-foot diesel-electric hybrid buses.

Investments are also being made in Ohio’s rural transit systems, including eight light transit vehicles and smaller buses.

Receiving new environmentally friendlier buses under this ODOT program will be:

  • Akron Regional Transit Authority ($2 million) - 4 hybrid electric/diesel 40 ft. buses
  • Central Ohio Transit Authority ($1.2 million) - 2 hybrid electric/diesel 40 ft. buses
  • Clermont Transportation Connection ($750,000) - 2 diesel 40 ft. buses
  • Greater Dayton Regional Transit Authority ($2.3 million) -4 hybrid electric/diesel 40 ft. buses
  • Miami County Public Transit ($150,000) - 2 diesel light transit vehicles
  • Portage Area Regional Transportation Authority ($375,000) - 5 diesel light transit vehicles
  • Southwest Ohio Regional Transit Authority ($1.9 million) - 3 hybrid electric/diesel 40 ft. buses
  • Springfield City Area Transit ($684,320) - 4 hybrid electric/diesel 30 ft. buses
  • Stark Area Regional Transit Authority ($2.3 million) - 6 biodiesel 30-35 ft. buses
  • Toledo Area Regional Transit Authority ($3.3 million) - 8 biodiesel 30-35 ft. buses
  • Washington County/CABL ($75,000) - 1 diesel 30 ft. bus


In Ohio’s cities, public transit reduces congestion, improves air quality, and drives economic activity. According to an ODOT analysis, sixty percent of urban transit trips are work related. In Ohio’s rural areas — where more than half of the riders are senior citizens or people with disabilities — public transit provides access to health care, education and opportunity, according to an agency statement.

deli.cio.us digg it stumble upon newsvine
[ Request More Info about this product / service / company ]


E-NEWSLETTER

Receive the latest Metro E-Newsletters in your inbox!

Join the Metro E-Newsletters and receive the latest news in your e-mail inbox once a week. SIGN UP NOW!

View the latest eNews
Express Tuesday | Express Thursday | University Transit

White Papers

Factors in Transit Bus Ramp Slope and Wheelchair-Seated Passenger Safety Nearly 3 million U.S. adults are wheelchair or scooter users1, and as the population ages this number is expected to rise. Many wheelchair users rely upon public transportation to access work, medical care, school and social activities.

Mass Transit Capital Planning An overview of the world-class best practices for assessing, prioritizing, and funding capital projects to optimize resources and align with the organization’s most critical immediate and long-term goals.

The Benefits of Door-to-Door Service in ADA Complementary Paratransit Many U.S. transit agencies continue to struggle with the quality of ADA service, the costs, and the difficulties encountered in contracting the service, which is the method of choice for a significant majority of agencies. One of the most basic policy decisions an agency must make involves whether to provide door-to-door, or only curb-to-curb service.

More white papers


 
DIGITAL EDITION

The full contents of Metro Magazine on your computer! The digital edition is an exact replica of the print magazine with enhanced search, multimedia and hyperlink features. View the current issue